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  • 'Blatant disrespect of Black women': Women leaders criticize treatment of Black women being considered as Biden VP pick

    'Blatant disrespect of Black women': Women leaders criticize treatment of Black women being considered as Biden VP pickSen. Kamala Harris, Rep. Karen Bass, Susan Rice, Rep. Val Demings and Stacey Abrams have all been floated as possible running mates for Biden.


  • Oregon Senator Ron Wyden says Trump deployed 'secret police' in Portland to provoke violence for campaign ads

    Oregon Senator Ron Wyden says Trump deployed 'secret police' in Portland to provoke violence for campaign adsSen. Ron Wyden argues that President Trump sent federal agents to Portland in order to "create images of chaos for his own political gain."


  • Satellite imagery shows scale of destruction after explosion at Beirut port

    Satellite imagery shows scale of destruction after explosion at Beirut portSatellite imagery from Planet Labs, Inc. and Maxar Technologies shows the damage sustained by yesterday?s explosions at the Port of Beirut in Lebanon.


  • Baltimore is investigating after officials removed 5 approved Black Lives Matter murals

    Baltimore is investigating after officials removed 5 approved Black Lives Matter muralsThe city department blamed a "miscommunication" for the error, but also said a staff member accused of problematic behavior is under investigation.


  • Poll: Most Black Americans Want Police to Remain in Their Areas

    Poll: Most Black Americans Want Police to Remain in Their AreasMost black Americans say they want police to continue their current presence in local areas, even as protests against racism and police brutality sweep the nation, and calls to reform and even defund police departments persist.Close to two-thirds, 61 percent, of black Americans said they want the police presence in their area to remain the same, while 20 percent said they would like to see police spend more time in their neighborhood, according to a new Gallup poll. Another 19 percent said they would like to see the police presence in their area decrease.Among the general population, 67 percent of Americans say they want the police presence near them to remain the same, with 71 percent of white Americans saying so. A majority of other minority communities also said they do not want to see fewer police officers patrolling their neighborhoods, with 59 percent of Hispanics preferring the current police presence.Black Americans said they observe police in their neighborhoods slightly more than other groups, 32 percent saying they see police officers often or very often in their area, above the national average of 24 percent of all Americans who say the same. About 27 percent said they rarely or never see police in their neighborhoods. Only 22 percent of white Americans said they see police often or very often around where they live.Of black Americans who see police frequently in their areas, only about a third say they think police should curtail their time in the neighborhood, similar to the overall percentage who say so.Despite most black Americans approving of the level of police presence in their neighborhoods, less than one in five say they are very confident that they would be treated with courtesy and respect during an encounter with police. Meanwhile, over half, 56 percent, of white Americans say they are confident in the same.The Gallup poll was taken after weeks of unrest in metropolitan areas around the country over police tactics involving interactions with minority communities, particularly black Americans. Protests and riots broke out in May in many cities following the police custody death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck as he pleaded for air.Calls to defund police have been particularly prevalent in Portland, Ore. and Seattle, Wash., both of which are predominantly white cities.The survey was conducted online from June 23 to July 6.


  • North Korea's escalating virus response raises fear of outbreak

    North Korea's escalating virus response raises fear of outbreakNorth Korea is quarantining thousands of people and shipping food and other aid to a southern city locked down over coronavirus worries, officials said, as the country's response to a suspected case reinforces doubt about its longstanding claim to be virus-free. But amid the outside skepticism and a stream of North Korean propaganda glorifying its virus efforts, an exchange between Pyongyang and the United Nations is providing new clarity - and actual numbers - about what might be happening in the North, which has closed its borders and cut travel - never a free-flowing stream - by outsider monitors and journalists. In late July, North Korea said it had imposed its "maximum emergency system" to guard against the virus spreading after finding a person with Covid-19 symptoms in Kaesong city, near the border with rival South Korea. State media reported that leader Kim Jong-un then ordered a total lockdown of Kaesong, and said the suspected case was a North Korean who had earlier fled to South Korea before slipping back into Kaesong last month. North Korea's public admission of its first potential case and the emergency steps it took prompted immediate outside speculation that Pyongyang may be worried about a big outbreak after months of steadfastly claiming it had no cases. Foreign experts are highly skeptical over the North's assertion of no cases, in large part because of its long, porous border with China, where the virus emerged, and its history of hiding past disease outbreaks.


  • China threatens countermeasures as Taiwan prepares for U.S. visit

    China threatens countermeasures as Taiwan prepares for U.S. visitChina on Thursday threatened to take countermeasures over a trip to Taiwan by U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar, as the Chinese-claimed island geared up for its highest-level U.S. official visit in four decades. The visit, which begins on Sunday, adds to tensions between Beijing and Washington over everything from trade and human rights to the novel coronavirus pandemic. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told a daily briefing in Beijing that any attempt to deny or challenge the "one China" principle, which states that Taiwan is part of China, would end in failure.


  • Direct-to-Consumer Furniture Brand Burrow Expands Its Offerings

  • A nuclear sea-launched cruise missile will help deter nuclear aggression

    A nuclear sea-launched cruise missile will help deter nuclear aggressionA Pentagon official argues a nuclear sea-launched cruise missile is a measured response to a growing threat from America's adversaries.


  • Biden may have narrowed his VP list down to Kamala Harris and Susan Rice

    Biden may have narrowed his VP list down to Kamala Harris and Susan RiceFormer Vice President Joe Biden could be down to two contenders in his search for a running mate.A new report from Axios details how Biden confidants believe he has narrowed his list down to Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and former National Security Adviser Susan Rice. While the report cautions that things could change, it notes that these confidants "would be surprised if he picks anyone else."As far as Harris goes, Axios writes that Biden's brain trust has "deep and trusting relationships" with those who are pushing for the California senator while touting her skills as a prosecutor. But on the other hand, according to the report, Rice is "getting a big bounce" from former President Barack Obama's alumni, who say that picking her would "guarantee the enthusiastic presence" of Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama on the campaign trail.Other possible contenders include Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.), who the report says is in third place behind Harris and Rice, as well as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.). The Washington Post previously reported that Biden was expected to interview five or six finalists but that there was a sense that he still doesn't have "a clear favorite."Though Biden had previously said he intended to make his running mate pick in the first week of August, the announcement is no longer expected to come until next week, prior to the Democratic National Convention's start on Aug. 17. Read more at Axios. More stories from theweek.com New Lincoln Project ad crowns Jared Kushner 'Secretary of Failure' Nintendo's profits climb more than 400 percent amid coronavirus lockdowns The Republican problem no one knows how to solve


  • At least 3 cruise ships are battling coronavirus outbreaks as the industry's return hits a rocky start

    At least 3 cruise ships are battling coronavirus outbreaks as the industry's return hits a rocky startThe US isn't allowing sailing from its ports until October, but many ships in Europe have resumed sailings after a months-long pause.


  • Beirut Ignored Public Warning There Was a Russian ?Bomb? at the Port

    Beirut Ignored Public Warning There Was a Russian ?Bomb? at the PortYears before a devastating blast killed at least 100 people and injured more than 4,000 in Beirut Tuesday, a maritime analyst issued a public warning that a Russian ?floating bomb? was languishing in the city?s docks.Maritime monitoring systems tracked the Rhosus into port in Beirut in September 2013. The ship, which was flagged in Moldova, listed its official cargo as ?agricultural commodities.? The 2,750 metric ton cargo of ammonium nitrate would primarily be used for fertilizers or high power explosives. To put it in context, less than two metric tons of ammonium nitrate was used in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. The Russian-owned cargo ship called into port in Beirut for reasons unknown, possibly after running into trouble at sea en route from Georgia to Mozambique. Beirut authorities blocked it from leaving and the dangerous cargo was offloaded and stored in Hanger 12 in the port a year later, according to the maritime monitoring website Fleetmon. Mikhail Voytenko, a Russian maritime analyst based in Thailand, warned in July 2014 that the ship, which he said was owned by a Russian operator, was effectively a ?floating bomb.? Voytenko said the ship?s owners had abandoned the ship and its crew, and the Lebanese authorities had failed to protect the deadly cargo. ?There are a lot of restrictions, regulations and rules to stick to when talking about storing explosives like ammonium but they just stored it in a warehouse and forgot about it,? he told The Daily Beast by phone from close to the Laem Chabang port in Thailand where he works.The Russian captain of the abandoned ship, Boris Prokoshev, and three Ukrainian crew members Valery Lupol, 3rd mechanic Andrey Golovyoshkin and boatswain Boris Musinchak, were made to stay on the ship with the deadly cargo after the other six crew members were released. They launched an appeal to get out, writing to Russian and Ukrainian journalists and to a group that supports seamen.?The shipowner abandoned the vessel. The cargo owner has ammonium nitrate in the hold,? Musinchak wrote in an email to both the Assol Seamen Aid Foundation and the diplomatic services of Ukraine. ?It is an explosive substance... This is how we live for free on a powder keg for 10 months.?A Lebanese court then reportedly gave permission to unload the cargo, but not before asking the sailors to find a buyer for it themselves, which they claimed in the email they could not because all communication was stripped from the ship. On Wednesday, Prokoshev appeared on Russian television, insisting that even the lawyer who tried to free them was corrupt and not concerned about the fate of the ammonium nitrate. ?For some reason, the consignee did not lift a finger to get his cargo out,? he said.The ship was owned and operated by Igor Grechushkin, a Russian, who now moved to Cyprus, according to the stranded sailors. Calls to Grechushkin were not immediately answered.As well as the public warning, Lebanese officials had repeatedly ignored warnings by port authorities about the ammonium nitrate that sparked the devastating explosion.Badri Daher, the current head of Lebanon?s customs authority, told reporters on the scene that the explosion was linked to the ammonium nitrate. Several people in the open source intelligence community later tweeted photos of loosely packed bags of white powder, assumed to be the substance. The Daily Beast has not verified the authenticity of the photos.On June 27, 2014, Shafik Merhi, then head of the Lebanese Customs Authority wrote to Lebanese officials under the heading ?urgent matters,? asking for help to secure the explosives, according to a copy of the letter shared on Twitter by human rights activist Wadih Al Asmar. Merhi then reportedly sent five more letters, in December 5, 2014, May 6, 2015, May 20, 2016, October 13, 2016, and October 27, 2017, pleading for help, according to Al Jazeera, which reports one as saying, ?In view of the serious danger of keeping these goods in the hangar in unsuitable climatic conditions, we reaffirm our request to please request the marine agency to re-export these goods immediately to preserve the safety of the port and those working in it, or to look into agreeing to sell this amount.?Another letter, this time written by Daher, the incoming head of Lebanese Customs Authority reiterated the warning of ?the danger of leaving these goods in the place they are, and to those working there.?Lebanon?s new prime minister Hassan Diab, who came to the job in January 2020, alluded to the theory that the devastation could have been avoided, promising that ?all those responsible for this catastrophe will pay a price.?President Donald Trump referred to the explosion as an attack, though local authorities say it was likely set off by a welder working nearby. ?I?ve met with some of our great generals and they just seem to feel that?.?.?.?this was not some kind of a manufacturing explosion type of event,? Trump said at a White House briefing. ?They seem to think it was an attack. It was a bomb of some kind.?On Wednesday, hundreds were still reported missing from the massive explosion, which generated seismic waves similar to a 3.3 magnitude earthquake. Beirut port, which is dubiously nicknamed the Cave of Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves because of the alleged corruption tied to its management, has been under intense scrutiny in recent months after the October Revolution began last fall. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • A Florida woman was kicked off an American Airlines flight for wearing a 'F--- 12' face mask

    A Florida woman was kicked off an American Airlines flight for wearing a 'F--- 12' face maskArlinda Johns told local news that she put on a new mask when she was told her mask was offensive. She was later escorted off the flight.


  • MS-13 gang members charged with sex trafficking, other charges in abuse of 13-year-old runaway

    MS-13 gang members charged with sex trafficking, other charges in abuse of 13-year-old runawayFederal prosecutors allege that gang members beat the girl, raped her and prostituted her in Virginia and Maryland.


  • White House responds to Trump encouraging voting by mail in Florida after criticizing it for months

    White House responds to Trump encouraging voting by mail in Florida after criticizing it for monthsWhite House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany responded Tuesday to President Trump's encouraging of voting by mail in Florida after criticizing it for months.


  • Joshua Wong and other Hong Kong activists charged over banned June 4 vigil

    Joshua Wong and other Hong Kong activists charged over banned June 4 vigilTwo dozen people in Hong Kong, including pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong, have been charged with participating in an illegal assembly at a vigil on June 4 commemorating the crackdown on protesters in and around Beijing's Tiananmen square in 1989. It was the first time the vigil had been banned in semiautonomous Hong Kong, with police citing coronavirus restrictions on group gatherings in refusing permission for it to take place. The anniversary struck an especially sensitive nerve in the former British colony this year, falling just as China prepared to introduce national security legislation later that month in response to last year's often violent pro-democracy demonstrations.


  • Latin America now has world's highest coronavirus death toll

    Latin America now has world's highest coronavirus death tollThe region has now recorded more than 206,000 deaths, approximately 30% of the global total.


  • Esper says he underestimated how much racial injustice affects service members

    Esper says he underestimated how much racial injustice affects service membersDefense Secretary Mark Esper called George Floyd's death a wake-up call for military leadership.


  • The story of how Manhattan Project workers tried to stop the atomic bombs 75 years ago

    The story of how Manhattan Project workers tried to stop the atomic bombs 75 years agoManhattan Project scientists sent petitions to the president to stop the atomic bombs, but they were never delivered.


  • A woman allegedly smashed a police officer's head into concrete after being told to wear a mask

    A woman allegedly smashed a police officer's head into concrete after being told to wear a maskA woman in Australia allegedly smashed a police officer's head into concrete after being told to wear a mask. The officer was left concussed.


  • Portland's Black police chief says violent protesters have 'taken away from' the Black Lives Matter movement

    Portland's Black police chief says violent protesters have 'taken away from' the Black Lives Matter movementWhile the protests in downtown Portland have largely been peaceful, there have been violent offshoots in other parts of the city this week.


  • Syrian refugee hailed as hero in Germany after saving woman from rapist

    Syrian refugee hailed as hero in Germany after saving woman from rapistA Syrian refugee has been hailed as a hero in Germany after he stopped a man raping a woman. The 30-year-old Syrian, named only as Faner O under German privacy laws, intervened after he saw a woman being attacked by a man in the early hours of Sunday morning. With the help of another passerby, he overpowered the rapist and held him until police could reach the scene. The rape victim, who has not been named, is understood to be a trainee police officer. Faner O, who fled to Germany from his native Syria four years ago, works as a car mechanic in the west German city of Wuppertal. He was driving home in the early hours of Sunday morning when he saw a woman being pursued by a man. ?It was around half past three in the morning. I had just dropped a friend off and was driving home to my wife and daughter, when I saw a woman walking along Friedrich-Engels-Allee and a man in a red T-shirt running after her. Then they disappeared into the bushes,? he told Bild newspaper. Concerned, Faner O stopped his car and followed them into the bushes, where he found the man pinning the woman to the ground. ?He had one hand over her mouth and was choking her with the other. She was resisting, but he was very strong.? The would-be rapist fled but Faner O gave chase. A 20-year-old passerby who had heard the sounds of struggle came to his help, and together they were able to overpower the perpetrator. The rapist has not been named but is understood to be a 20-year-old Afghan migrant known to local police in connection with similar incidents. The woman suffered only minor injuries, according to local police. ?She fought hard and cried out for help. This alerted witnesses who rushed to her aid and drove off her attacker. They then gave chase and were able to seize him after a short pursuit. They held him until officers arrived,? police said in a statement. Faner O said he was not afraid during the encounter. ?At that moment I was only thinking of helping the woman,? he told Bild. ?If something like that happened to my daughter, I?d want some one to help her.?


  • Teen ?mastermind? accused of crippling Twitter hack is linked to deadly home robbery

    Teen ?mastermind? accused of crippling Twitter hack is linked to deadly home robberyA Florida teenager who is accused of participating in last month?s Twitter bitcoin scam, which saw several of the world?s highest-profile accounts hacked, has reportedly been linked to an attempted robbery that ended in a lethal shooting.An investigation by the Tampa Bay Times has found that 17-year-old Graham Ivan Clark, who is credited by police as one of the ?masterminds? of the scam, has also been named in the case of a burglary seven months ago that saw one teenager killed and another wounded.


  • 'They're dying ? it is what it is': key takeaways from Trump's shocking interview

    'They're dying ? it is what it is': key takeaways from Trump's shocking interviewPresident floundered in conversation with Axios, claiming Covid-19 was ?under control? and attacking mail-in votingDonald Trump stumbled through his second damaging interview in as many weeks, floundering in a conversation with the news website Axios over key issues he is tasked with responding to as president.It?s been just over two weeks since the president made a series of shocking statements in a one-on-one interview with Fox News, but he packed another host of extraordinary claims into a 37-minute interview released on Monday night by Axios.Here are the eight most glaring things Trump said to reporter Jonathan Swan. ?It is what it is?In a lengthy discussion about the US?s poor response to coronavirus, Trump described the pandemic as ?under control?.Swan responded: ?How? A thousand Americans are dying a day.??They are dying. That?s true. And you ? it is what it is,? Trump said. ?But that doesn?t mean we aren?t doing everything we can. It?s under control as much as you can control it.? ?You can?t do that?The president then appeared unable to distinguish between different measurements of coronavirus deaths.Trump brandished several pieces of paper with graphs and charts.?United States is lowest in numerous categories. We?re lower than the world. Lower than Europe.??In what?? Swan asked. As it becomes apparent that Trump is talking about the number of deaths as a proportion of confirmed Covid-19 cases, Swan said: ?Oh, you?re doing death as a proportion of cases. I?m talking about death as a proportion of population. That?s where the US is really bad. Much worse than Germany, South Korea.?Trump responded: ?You can?t do that.? ?He didn?t come to my inauguration?Trump downplayed the work of the congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis, whose funeral was held last week in Atlanta, Georgia. Instead of Lewis?s legacy, Trump focused on Lewis in relation to himself.?I never met John Lewis, actually,? Trump said. ?He didn?t come to my inauguration. He didn?t come to my State of the Union speeches, and that?s OK. That?s his right.?Lewis?s fight for racial equality includes having his skull broken by state troopers during the 1965 Bloody Sunday march in Alabama. As a congressman he worked across the aisle. ?I did more for the black community than anybody?Swan pressed for an analysis of systemic racism. Trump said: ?I have seen where there is a difference and I don?t want there to be a difference.?When asked why black men are 2.5 times more likely to be killed by police, the president spoke about how many white people are killed by the police.Then said: ?I did more for the black community than anybody with a possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, whether you like it or not.?When asked whether he did more than Lyndon B Johnson, who signed into law the Civil Rights Act in 1964 (and the Voting Rights Act in 1965), Trump didn?t really answer the question. ?I do wish her well?Trump stood by a 21 July comment where he said ?I wish her well? of Ghislaine Maxwell, a longtime associate of Jeffrey Epstein who faces federal charges for allegedly enabling the disgraced financier?s sex trafficking of minor girls.Asked for his thoughts on Maxwell, Trump said, ?Yeah, I wish her well. I?d wish you well. I wish a lot of people well.? Promotes Epstein conspiracy theoryHe also promoted the conspiracy theory that Epstein was murdered when he died in a New York jail last August. This has been disputed by the attorney general, William Barr.?Her boyfriend died in jail and people are still trying to figure out how did it happen, was it suicide, was he killed?? Trump said. ?I do wish her well. I?m not looking for anything bad for her.? ?Lots of things can happen?Trump again attacked mail-in voting, which is expected to occur at higher rates in the November election because of the pandemic.?It could be decided many months later,? Trump said. ?Do you know why? Because lots of things will happen during that period of time. Especially when you have tight margins, lots of things can happen. There?s never been anything like this ? Now, of course, right now we have to live with it, but we?re challenging it.? ?I have heard that, but it has never reached my desk?Trump said reports that Russia had been offering bounties to the Taliban for attacks on US forces in Afghanistan were ?fake news?. When Swan asked whether Trump had ever discussed the bounties with the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, Trump said he had not.When Swan asked Trump about Russia supplying weapons to the Taliban, the president asserted: ?I have heard that, but it has never reached my desk.?


  • What you need to know about the coronavirus right now

    What you need to know about the coronavirus right nowLatin America surpassed Europe on Tuesday to become the region with the highest novel coronavirus death toll, according to a Reuters tally. Brazil, the Latin American country most affected by the coronavirus, had recorded a total of 95,819 deaths as of Tuesday. Australia's Victoria state reported a record rise in new coronavirus cases and deaths on Wednesday, as it prepared to close much of its economy to control a second wave of infection that threatens to spread across the country.


  • N. Korea's escalating virus response raises fear of outbreak

    N. Korea's escalating virus response raises fear of outbreakNorth Korea is quarantining thousands of people and shipping food and other aid to a southern city locked down over coronavirus worries, officials said, as the country?s response to a suspected case reinforces doubt about its longstanding claim to be virus-free. In late July, North Korea said it had imposed its ?maximum emergency system? to guard against the virus spreading after finding a person with COVID-19 symptoms in Kaesong city, near the border with rival South Korea. State media reported that leader Kim Jong Un then ordered a total lockdown of Kaesong, and said the suspected case was a North Korean who had earlier fled to South Korea before slipping back into Kaesong last month.


  • Milwaukee mayor: Biden won't accept nomination here

    Milwaukee mayor: Biden won't accept nomination hereMilwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett has confirmed that Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden will not travel to the Wisconsin city to accept his party's White House nomination because of concerns over the coronavirus. (Aug. 5)


  • This is what it looked like after the US dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima 75 years ago

    This is what it looked like after the US dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima 75 years agoOn August 6, 1945, a U.S. bomber famously known as the Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, marking a historic act of nuclear warfare.


  • Bill Gates issued a stark warning for the world: 'As awful as this pandemic is, climate change could be worse'

    Bill Gates issued a stark warning for the world: 'As awful as this pandemic is, climate change could be worse'Gates said to understand the impact climate change will have, we need to "look at COVID-19 and spread the pain out over a much longer period of time."


  • 5 science-backed benefits of vitamin B12 and how to get enough of it in your diet

    5 science-backed benefits of vitamin B12 and how to get enough of it in your dietThere are many health benefits of vitamin B12 from red blood cell production to growing healthy hair and nails.


  • Narendra Modi lays Ayodhya temple foundation, delighting Hindus and dismaying Muslims

    Narendra Modi lays Ayodhya temple foundation, delighting Hindus and dismaying MuslimsNarendra Modi, the Indian Prime Minister, has invigorated his Hindu support base after laying the foundation stone of a controversial new temple on a site contested by Muslims. In November, after a decades-old legal battle, India?s highest court ruled a temple could be built in the city of Ayodhya, where a mosque had stood until it was destroyed by Hindu mobs in 1992. Mr Modi made its construction a key pledge as part of his Hindu nationalist campaign, which saw him re-elected with a landslide victory last year. Many Hindus believe the deity Ram was born at the temple site in Ayodhya, and soil was gathered from more than 2,000 holy sites for its building work. Calling it the ?dawn of a new era?, Mr Modi said: ?India is emotional as decades of wait has ended. For years, our Ram Lalla [the infant Lord Ram] lived beneath a tent; now he will reside in a grand temple.?


  • Former Census Bureau directors warn of 'seriously incomplete' count after Trump administration cuts it short

    Former Census Bureau directors warn of 'seriously incomplete' count after Trump administration cuts it shortFour former Census Bureau directors say it's a big mistake to cut counting efforts short. The Census Bureau said last week it would stop its in-person count on Sept. 30, a month earlier than its scheduled end date of Oct. 31. The move left census workers concerned a "massive undercount" is imminent. The former directors, who worked under nine past presidents, reflected that fear in a Tuesday statement, and called for the count's data delivery date to be extended to April 30, 2021, to avoid "seriously incomplete enumerations in many areas across our country."In-person census interviews are used to count people who didn't respond to a paper or online census, and are essential for counting underrepresented and hard-to-reach populations. The four former directors acknowledged the in-person count was supposed to happen from May 15 through July 31, but was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. This rescheduling led the Census Bureau to determine it needed four more months beyond the end of 2020 to tabulate congressional redistricting and apportionment stemming from the count, and the former directors agreed."Our expert opinion is that failing to extend the deadlines to April 30, 2021, will result in seriously incomplete enumerations in many areas across our country," the former leaders said, calling on Congress to make those necessary legal extension. In addition, they asked Congress "to require the Census Bureau to continue data collection operations through Oct. 30, 2020."More stories from theweek.com Republicans offer $400/week unemployment benefits, but stimulus bill talks remain divided New Lincoln Project ad crowns Jared Kushner 'Secretary of Failure' Report: Deutsche Bank complied with subpoena from New York prosecutors over Trump's finances


  • 'No such thing happened': Former acting AG Sally Yates says Obama, Biden did not urge Flynn inquiry

    'No such thing happened': Former acting AG Sally Yates says Obama, Biden did not urge Flynn inquiryYates was dismissed for refusing to defend President Donald Trump's Muslim travel ban days after he was inaugurated.


  • U.S. Representative Maloney declares victory in New York Democratic primary

    U.S. Representative Maloney declares victory in New York Democratic primaryU.S. Representative Carolyn Maloney, who has represented a New York City district in Congress since 1993, declared victory in a hard-fought Democratic primary on Tuesday, defeating progressive challenger Suraj Patel. Maloney announced the win in New York's 12th congressional district after the New York State Board of Elections certified the results from the June 23 primary. The conclusion of the race was delayed more than a month as election officials struggled to count thousands of mail-in ballots during the coronavirus pandemic.


  • China sentences 3rd Canadian to death on drug charges

    China sentences 3rd Canadian to death on drug chargesChina has sentenced a third Canadian citizen to death on drug charges amid a steep decline in relations between the two countries. The Guangzhou Municipal Intermediate Court announced Xu Weihong?s penalty on Thursday and said an alleged accomplice, Wen Guanxiong, had been given a life sentence. Death sentences are automatically referred to China?s highest court for review.


  • This May Be the Most Absurd, Trumpian Drama Ever

    This May Be the Most Absurd, Trumpian Drama EverThe federal agency primarily responsible for the distribution of foreign aid has been roiled in recent days by the most Trumpian of dramas, one involving an anti-LGBT political appointee, blundering conservative operative Jacob Wohl, accusations of stalking, prostitution, and the potential hiring of a young conservative with past racist writings. The chaos seemed set to crest with a slap-dash press conference scheduled for this Thursday. But within a day of the presser?s announcement, the main protagonist was apparently recanting her accusations and insinuating that Wohl had stolen her phone and signed into her Twitter account to send the offending messages that set off the fireworks that got her fired. The setting of the entire mess was the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), an agency known largely as a bit of a backwater when it comes to the government?s foreign policy apparatus, but one with a $16.8 billion foreign aid budget. On Monday a political appointee and deputy White House liaison there, Merritt Corrigan, took to Twitter to accuse her employer of ?anti-Christian? bias. Corrigan?s appointment at USAID has been under fire for months over anti-gay tweets she made in 2019 and 2020, including accusing the United States of being a ?homo-empire? devoted to a ?tyrannical LGBT agenda,? tweeting that ?female empowerment is a civilizational calamity,? and advocating for the creation of a ?Christian patriarchy.? But on Monday, her targets were both USAID itself and House Foreign Relations Affairs Committee Chair Eliot Engel (D-NY), whom she accused of soliciting prostitutes. As Corrigan?s initial tweets went up, she claimed USAID gave her a 3 p.m. deadline to resign or be fired. When the deadline passed, Corrigan said she was fired.On its own, the episode was bizarre. But then it got much weirder. Jacob Wohl Charged With Felony in CaliforniaCorrigan, who is/was apparently dating Wohl, announced that she?d be appearing Thursday in front of Wohl associate Jack Burkman?s Northern Virginia house?a site that has previously hosted farcical attempts to smear Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Kamala Harris (D-CA) with lurid sexual allegations. There, she would further denounce USAID, accuse a Politico reporter who covered her resignation of stalking her, and demand that Engel debate her and Burkman. In a press release announcing the press conference, Burkman and Wohl claimed that Wohl, who is currently facing two felony charges related to security sales in California, had ?been working behind the scenes with Corrigan for months.?Jacob Wohl?s Bogus Warren Accuser Exaggerated His Military Service RecordEngel?s office did not return a request for comment. And, perhaps, for good reason. The accusations have no proof or merit, and as the story unfolded it became increasingly difficult to get a read on where the truth actually began and the innuendo and smears ended. On Tuesday afternoon, Corrigan deleted her tweets attacking USAID and stopped responding to messages from The Daily Beast. Wohl claimed in an interview Tuesday that a coterie of Trumpworld personalities had convinced Corrigan to backtrack on her claims. And Burkman claimed that Corrigan had ?buyer?s remorse? after sending her tweets. ?Somebody does something and then they regret it,? Burkman said. But later in the day, a conduit sent a statement from Corrigan herself that was darker in implication. Corrigan now claimed she?d become the pawn of individuals who had attempted to ?ruin? her. "I would like to apologize,? it read. ?Especially to the people who have been affected or hurt by the messages sent from my Twitter account, and the claims made in my name over the past 24 hours. I did NOT send these messages, and while I vehemently protested about them being sent in my name, my devices were not in my control. I see now that I was part of an abusive scheme and I was used to attack people that have nothing to do with me.?I will not be participating in any press conferences as claimed in my name, and will have nothing to do with individuals who forced me to hand over my devices so they could control me and the output in my name. Due to naivete and inexperience, I became involved with people who abused my trust, conned me, and claimed they were working in my interest. I became powerless in a situation, and I deeply regret not reaching out to people who knew better, or could help me.?Corrigan is far from the first Wohl associate to bail on one of his press conferences. But she does appear to be the first to have formally held such a high post at a government agency. And her drama illustrates the degree to which the once-staid USAID has become a stomping grounds for a twisted, absurdist circus involving Trumpian figures who despise one another and are notorious for trying to conduct botched operations against their political foes.Prior to the apparent change of course, Corrigan had also made one other noteworthy assertion?that USAID was set to hire yet another controversial political appointment: conservative personality Kyle Kashuv, whose admission to Harvard was revoked last year over racist remarks he made in high school. Kashuv, a survivor of the 2018 Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida, rose to fame on the right in the aftermath of the shooting as a conservative counterweight to pro-gun control Parkland students. Kashuv?s opposition to the gun control measures pushed by his classmates earned him a visit to the White House, and a position at conservative campus group Turning Point USA. Along the way, Kashuv antagonized Wohl and some of his right-wing associates for actions like criticizing anti-Muslim activist Laura Loomer for wearing a Nazi-era Jewish star to protest her Twitter ban. Harvard Pulls Pro-Gun Parkland Survivor Kyle Kashuv?s Admission Over Racial SlursBut Kashuv?s star on the right imploded in May 2019, when he was exposed by a fellow classmate for writing racist messages and Google Doc notes. In one text message, Kashuv complained that a classmate dated ?ni**erjocks.? In the aftermath of the reporting on Kashuv?s remarks, Harvard revoked Kashuv?s admission to its undergraduate class.Corrigan claims Kashuv has been offered a political appointment to be a special assistant to USAID Deputy Administrator Bonnie Glick, after initially being considered for a congressional liaison position. That job offer, she adds, was one point of disagreement with her fellow USAID officials that ultimately led to her speaking out against the agency. ?I don?t believe that he?s a real conservative, and his prior media was going to bring a lot of negativity to USAID,? Corrigan told The Daily Beast. The Daily Beast wasn?t able to confirm that Kashuv has been offered a position at USAID, but did obtain a document dated July 31 purporting to be an offer letter from USAID, offering Kashuv a position with roughly $50,000 annual salary as an assistant to Glick, pending a security clearance. The purported offer letter to Kashuv listed the phone number of a USAID employee. When a reporter for The Daily Beast called the number, the woman who answered identified herself as a USAID employee but refused to answer questions about the letter.?I?m sorry, I can?t answer your call,? the woman said, before hanging up.USAID declined repeated requests to comment on whether the agency had offered Kashuv a position, but a spokesperson said USAID would investigate ?any complaints of anti-Christian bias? made by Corrigan.Kashuv didn?t respond to multiple requests for comment. Glick, who called Kashuv a ?rockstar? in a May tweet, also didn?t respond to requests for comment. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • Op-Ed: U.S. leaders knew we didn't have to drop atomic bombs on Japan to win the war. We did it anyway

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  • Germany is showing 'very concerning' signs of a second coronavirus wave, the country's doctors' union has warned

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  • I tried making Guy Fieri's signature recipes for a week, and I didn't love my whole trip to Flavortown

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  • Pakistani court sparks outrage by ruling 14-year-old Christian girl must stay married to alleged abductor

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  • Republican senator gives Trump 'big stick' to carry as election nears

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  • 'Hoping it goes well': Students among first to return offer lessons for reopening schools

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  • Trump?s Debate Moderator Wish List Is Stacked With Fox News Stars and Pushovers

    Trump?s Debate Moderator Wish List Is Stacked With Fox News Stars and PushoversThe Trump campaign released a list of suggested moderators for this year?s presidential debates and, perhaps unsurprisingly, it is loaded with many of the president?s favorite right-wing pundits and Fox News personalities.As the president pushes for more debates against former Vice President Joe Biden, his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani on Wednesday sent the presiding commission a letter requesting a fourth debate and an early September start to the events due to early mail-in voting.Calling the current timetable ?an outdated dinosaur,? Giuliani wrote that by the time the first debate?currently scheduled for Sept. 29?occurs, ?as many as eight million Americans in 16 states will have already started voting.? Therefore, per Giuliani, even if the commission won?t approve an additional debate, the campaign wants to move the final debate scheduled for Oct. 22 to the first week of September, before the first ballots are sent out.The letter concluded with a list of 24 names the Trump campaign submitted for ?consideration as moderators? since Biden has ?confirmed he is indeed available to leave his basement for the fall debate.? (Team Trump has repeatedly implied that the vice president is looking to ?weasel? out of the debates.)A large portion of the names would be familiar to the most devoted of Fox News viewers. While the president didn?t include his close confidants like Sean Hannity or Lou Dobbs, and left off the denizens of his favorite morning show Fox & Friends, the campaign included several pundits and personalities featured across his favorite Fox programming.Rachel Campos-Duffy, a Fox News contributor and former Real World cast member, made the cut despite her role as a sycophantic pro-Trump commentator across Fox?s opinion shows. Campos-Duffy is married to former Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI), a current CNN contributor who now serves as an official Trump surrogate.Fox Business Network anchor Maria Bartiromo also made the list. As a friend of the president?s, dating back to their time as New York media icons, Bartiromo has morphed into one of the more overtly pro-Trump hosts on that network. She is one of the president?s go-to interviewers as she will often lob softball questions and sing his praises during their on-air chats. The former CNBC reporter has also made a habit?much like Dobbs and Hannity?of railing against a so-called ?deep state? plot against Trump.Other Fox names on the list came from the network?s ostensible ?hard news? side. Anchors like Bret Baier, Shannon Bream, Bill Hemmer, and Harris Faulkner all made the cut. Faulkner was accused of being deferential to Trump during a 2018 chat?which included the question ?What do you love about being president???though she was a bit more aggressive in her most recent interview, in which Trump made bizarre claims about Black Lives Matter and Abraham Lincoln. Baier, meanwhile, is a centerpiece of the network?s ?hard news? operation and has often pushed back on the president?s attacks on his fellow news-side and polling colleagues.The campaign also included Fox Business Network hosts like Dagen McDowell, Charles Payne, and Gerry Baker, all of whom wear their conservative politics on their sleeves and repeatedly boost the president?s policies and positions. Additionally, the list included Fox Business correspondent Susan Li, who most recently came under fire for a segment?during Baier?s show?in which she tied historic stock-market gains to violence against Black men.Outside of the Fox News bubble, Team Trump requested several high-profile conservative pundits and CPAC fixtures. Talk-radio host Hugh Hewitt, a former MSNBC host and conservative intellectual turned unapologetic Trump booster, was included on the list, as was right-wing radio talker Larry Elder, who regularly appears on Hannity?s show. Other names on the president?s wish list, such as Christian Broadcasting Network star David Brody and The Hill?s populist conservative commentator Saagar Enjeti, have sat down for friendly interviews with Trump in the past. And New York Post columnist Michael Goodwin, who has found his reliably pro-Trump op-eds routinely quoted on the president?s Twitter feed, is also on the campaign?s want list.The Trump campaign also highlighted several CNBC stars who are friendly to his politics: Squawk Box co-host Joe Kernen, who was recently called out on-air by his colleague for his seemingly blind devotion to Trump; and Rick Santelli, the godfather of the Tea Party movement, who infamously suggested in March that everyone in the U.S. should deliberately infect themselves with the coronavirus in order to lessen the outbreak?s impact on the stock market.But aside from the usual gaggle of Fox News stars and conservative pundits, the Trump campaign included some eyebrow-raising names like Today show host Hoda Kotb and respected broadcast journalists like CBS News reporters Norah O?Donnell and Major Garrett, Univision?s Ambrosio Hernandez, Bloomberg?s Kevin Cirilli, and ABC News? Tom Llamas and David Muir. O?Donnell, in particular, is already likely to moderate a debate should her network be tapped to host one. Same goes for Muir, who in May was roundly criticized for his interview with the president, in which Trump effectively steamrolled the ABC anchor who failed to push back on the president?s numerous lies and mischaracterizations about a deadly pandemic.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • Ex-UAW chief says GM bribery claims are 'utterly baseless'

  • Mysterious seeds sent from China to US identified by Trump administration

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  • A white woman spent years posing online as a Native American scientist and professor, and was caught after claiming the woman contracted coronavirus and died

    A white woman spent years posing online as a Native American scientist and professor, and was caught after claiming the woman contracted coronavirus and diedBethAnn McLaughlin admitted Tuesday that she created the @Sciencing_Bi account on Twitter, which had been active from 2016 until July 31.


  • Nearly 100 people in Ohio got sick after one man infected with the coronavirus attended a church service

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  • Sturgeon: I would 'very possibly' have joined in protest against my own exams policy

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