Futures Brokers Information Website

A great place to learn about futures brokers, futures trading platforms, and the latest geopolitical news.

Futures News - Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines

  • Pete Buttigieg and Beto O'Rourke spar over gun control comment at Democratic debate

    Pete Buttigieg and Beto O'Rourke spar over gun control comment at Democratic debateBeto O'Rourke responded to criticism about his remarks on his gun control plan, saying of Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell pretending to be interested, "sh--, that is not enough."


  • Omar Responds to Family of 9/11 Victim Who Criticized Her

    Omar Responds to Family of 9/11 Victim Who Criticized HerRepresentative Ilhan Omar responded on Sunday to the son of a victim of the September 11 terrorist attacks, who called her out for previous comments about the attacks that critics found dismissive.During the memorial service for 9/11 victims at Ground Zero, Nicholas Haros Jr., who lost his mother, 76-year-old Francis Haros, in the attacks, wore a shirt emblazoned with the phrase, "some people did something" on the front, the phrase Omar used to refer to the attacks.After reading the names of some of the victims, Haros Jr. repeated the phrase and pointed to his shirt."Today I am here to respond to you exactly who did what to whom," he said. "Madam, objectively speaking, we know who and what was done.""CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties," the Minnesota Democrat said earlier this year during remarks to the Council on American?Islamic Relations, a Muslim civil rights group, a comment that sparked outrage among conservatives and some families of victims."So 9/11 was an attack on all Americans. It was an attack on all of us and I certainly could not understand the weight of the pain that the victims of the families of 9/11 must feel, but I think it is really important for us to make sure that we are not forgetting the aftermath of what happened after 9/11," Omar responded Sunday on CBS when asked about Haros Jr.'s criticism. "Many Americans found themselves now having their civil rights stripped from them, and so what I was speaking to was the fact that as a Muslim, not only was I suffering as an American who was attacked on that day, but the next day I woke up as my fellow Americans were now treating me as a suspect."Haros Jr. appeared to accept Omar's goodwill, saying the congresswoman had "showed respect for the loss of families. And that was a good thing."


  • Locked and Loaded: Could Iran Sink the U.S. Navy If War Breaks Out?

    Locked and Loaded: Could Iran Sink the U.S. Navy If War Breaks Out?Tehran has lots of missiles. Could they start sinking warships?


  • Iran charges three detained Australians with spying

    Iran charges three detained Australians with spyingIran has charged three detained Australians with spying, a judiciary spokesman said on Tuesday, after the reported arrest of a travel-blogging couple and an academic. Two of the Australians were alleged to have used a drone to take pictures of military sites, while a third was accused of spying for another country, spokesman Gholamhossein Esmaili told reporters. It was the first official confirmation that Australians have been detained in Iran after the families of three of them said last week they had been arrested in the Islamic republic.


  • Best Bar Tools for Your Home Bar

    Best Bar Tools for Your Home Bar


  • 20 dead as truck falls off cliff in southern Philippines

    20 dead as truck falls off cliff in southern PhilippinesTwenty villagers were killed and 14 others were injured when the truck they were riding in lost control and fell off a cliff Tuesday in a remote mountain village in the southern Philippines, police and the Red Cross said. Provincial police chief Joel Limson said the truck was negotiating a downhill road in Tboli town in South Cotabato province when its brakes apparently failed and plummeted down a ravine, pinning 15 people to death. Police, Red Cross volunteers and villagers retrieved the 15 bodies from the wreckage at the bottom of the ravine.


  • Couple reveal they are raising child 'gender neutral' and haven't even told close family their baby's sex

    Couple reveal they are raising child 'gender neutral' and haven't even told close family their baby's sexA couple have decided to keep their baby?s sex a secret from close relatives in a bid to avoid gender bias.  Hobbit Humphrey, 38, and Jake England-Johns, 35, refer to their 17-month-old child, Anoush, with the pronoun, "they", and dress them in both girls' and boys' clothing. The married couple, who are members of the climate action group, Extinction Rebellion, have been accused of ?virtue signalling?. However, they are keen to let their child, Anoush, choose their own gender identity when they are old enough, because they wish for them to ?grow into their own person?.  Close family members have not been told the child?s sex and grandmother, Camille, only found out when she changed a nappy.   The couple, who live on a houseboat in  Keynsham, Somerset, discussed the ways in which they could challenge gender bias after discovering Ms Humphrey was pregnant.  Mr England-Johns told the BBC?s Inside Out: ?The neutral in gender neutral refers to us trying to behave neutrally towards our child rather than trying to make them neutral.?  ?Eventually, we decided that we wouldn?t tell people whether they were a boy or a girl ? in order to create this little bubble for our baby to be who they are,? Ms Humphrey said.  However their decision has sparked some controversy. Rosa Freedman, Professor of law conflict and global development at the University of Reading, said: ?While this is an individual case the worry would be that in the unlikely event many parents took up this way of parenting, that the NHS,  government, and service providers would not know what to plan for in the future as they would not know how many boys or girls exist.? ?Parents concerned about gendered social construct would do better to fight patriarchy, homophobia and transphobia rather and try to virtue signal to their friends and communities so they can get praise.? The couple have said that the reaction to their decision has been mixed. However Mr England-Johns said: ?But over a year in, it?s clear that we are serious and gradually people have got used to it.  ?Although, that still doesn?t stop some pretty confused looks from old ladies in the park when they come up to us and ask if they?re a boy or a girl. It can take a bit of explaining. ?We are quite good now at holding space for people?s discomfort in us going, ?Oh well, actually we don?t tell anyone, we?re not telling anyone for now.?


  • UPDATE 1-Russia detains two N.Korean vessels after one opens fire - reports

    UPDATE 1-Russia detains two N.Korean vessels after one opens fire - reportsRussian border guards have detained two North Korean boats in Russian territorial waters in the Sea of Japan after one of them attacked a Russian patrol, local media cited the Federal Security Service (FSB) as saying on Tuesday. A Russian border patrol discovered two North Korean schooners and 11 motorboats fishing illegally off its far eastern coast and detained the first vessel, prompting the second one to open fire, the FSB was quoted as saying. Three Russian border guards were wounded in the incident.


  • The world's oil producers keep a massive amount of capacity in reserve. But it's almost all in Saudi Arabia and the drone attack messed with that too.

    The world's oil producers keep a massive amount of capacity in reserve. But it's almost all in Saudi Arabia and the drone attack messed with that too.Drones hit two key Saudi Aramco oil refineries, shutting down production on around 5% of the world's daily oil production and causing prices to surge.


  • Trump heading to California to raise money, but keeping details secret

    Trump heading to California to raise money, but keeping details secretPrevious visits to the San Francisco Bay area ended with physical confrontations between supporters and demonstratorsDonald Trump steps off Air Force One in San Diego, California, on 13 March 2018. Photograph: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty ImagesDonald Trump?s past visits to California have been marked by chaotic protests, violent clashes and arrests.But his return this week may be different. That?s because no one knows where he?s going.Trump?s planned trip to the liberal Bay Area on Tuesday ? his first as president ? has been shrouded in secrecy, with officials declining to reveal the city where he?s holding a high-priced fundraiser. The visit to California, his fourth time traveling to the state since taking office, comes as the political and legal battles between the Trump administration and Democrats in California are dramatically escalating.The president, who has recently criticized California?s cities over the growing homelessness crisis, is expected to raise millions at a lunch somewhere in the Bay Area on Tuesday, followed by visits to Los Angeles and San Diego. Initial rumors suggested he would be going to Atherton, a Silicon Valley suburb in the country?s wealthiest zip code, but city officials there said it appeared plans had changed.Trump?s visit is a reminder that even though California remains a reliable Democratic stronghold and is seen as the leader of the ?resistance? to the president?s agenda, there are pockets that vote Republican and continue to back the president. And some of them are opening their wallets.?He?s coming here because he wants money,? said Jessica Levinson, a Loyola law school professor. ?California is the nation?s ATM. There?s a lot of wealth here. It?s smart fundraising.?Harmeet Dhillon, a Republican National Committee member from San Francisco and co-host of the Bay Area fundraiser, declined to share the location and other details with the Guardian, but said several hundred would be attending, some donating as much as $100,000.?I hope he sees that there are many Californians who are strongly supporting what he?s doing nationally,? she said.In California, which has formally sued the Trump administration dozens of times, residents have donated more money to the Trump 2020 campaign than to most Democratic candidates, according to an analysis in July. At the time, Trump had raised $3.2m in California, which was more than Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders had received from Golden State supporters.Intense backlash and calls for boycotts are expected when information does emerge about the California donors supporting Trump this time around. Some northern California anti-Trump groups have been organizing protest efforts, though they have struggled to make specific plans given the unknown location, the East Bay Times reported.Dhillon said she and others were not disclosing details because of safety concerns surrounding the potential for ?violent protesters?. She said she feared local police would not properly protect Trump?s guests.Trump?s previous trip to the region was a June 2016 San Jose rally, which saw physical confrontations between demonstrators and Trump fans.In recent years, pro-Trump rallies and far-right events in the state have repeatedly devolved into violence, but police and prosecutors have repeatedly targeted leftwing activists for arrest and prosecution even when they were victims of attacks.Last week, the Trump administration also sparked fears in Los Angeles with a visit to the city?s Skid Row, the epicenter of the homeless crisis, which came amid rumors that the president was seeking to push some kind of crackdown on people living on the street. There are growing concerns that the administration could try to relocate people out of encampments, and some reports have suggested Ben Carson, Trump?s housing and urban development secretary, will be visiting Los Angeles this week.The administration also secretly toured an abandoned Federal Aviation Administration facility in the region as a potential place to move people, according to the Washington Post.?We have a humanitarian crisis,? said Levinson. ?[Trump] rightly knows that it makes California and Los Angeles look terrible. The goal is bad publicity for Democrats.?Local advocates for homeless people told the Guardian last week they would welcome federal funding for housing and other social services, which the Trump administration has cut. But they said they were concerned about efforts to forcibly remove people or further criminalize the homeless ? whether by the US government or local authorities.?You?re the US government. Treat it like a state of emergency,? said Stephen ?Cue? Jn-Marie, a Los Angeles pastor who works with Skid Row residents. ?Give us resources we need to build housing.?It?s unclear if the president would have any legal authority relating to the placement of homeless people on the streets, an issue which is typically handled by municipal governments.Dhillon, of the RNC, said she was grateful he was talking about the subject. But she said: ?What can the president do about it? That?s an open question. This is really a quintessentially local issue.?


  • Cornell medical school to offer full scholarships for students who qualify for financial aid

    Cornell medical school to offer full scholarships for students who qualify for financial aidCornell now joins a growing list of medical schools that offer similar programs, including New York University and Columbia University.


  • The U.S. Army's Next Generation of Super Weapons Are Coming

    The U.S. Army's Next Generation of Super Weapons Are ComingAnd Iran, North Korea, Russia and China should be very afraid.


  • 20 arrested, 18 charged in Minneapolis beatings

    20 arrested, 18 charged in Minneapolis beatingsMinneapolis police chief, assault victim talk to Fox News about arrests in downtown beatings; Matt Finn reports.


  • Ex-Ukraine central bank chief's home burnt down in attack

    Ex-Ukraine central bank chief's home burnt down in attackUkrainian police on Tuesday investigated a fire that destroyed the house of a reformist former central bank chief, who along with the bank called it an act of "terror". Valeria Gontareva said her country home in a village north of Kiev burnt to the ground after being struck with a Molotov cocktail on Tuesday morning. "The terror continues," Gontareva told Interfax Ukraine from London, where she now lives.


  • Suspected Florida Serial Killer Linked to Murders of Four Women: Authorities

    Suspected Florida Serial Killer Linked to Murders of Four Women: AuthoritiesPalm Beach County Sheriff's OfficeFlorida authorities have arrested a suspected serial killer believed to be responsible for the brutal murders of at least four women over the last 14 years.Robert Hayes, 37, was arrested and charged Sunday night with the grisly 2016 murder of 32-year-old Rachel Bey, whose body was found along a highway in Jupiter, Palm Beach County Sheriff Rich Bradshaw announced at a Monday press conference.?We?ve been able to take what we believe is a serial killer off our streets? Bradshaw said. ?Had we not done this, we?re pretty certain he would have killed again.?While Hayes has only been charged with one murder, he?s suspected in at least three cold cases in Daytona, Florida, after semen found on Bey?s body matched DNA discovered on other victims. All of the victims?LaQuetta Gunther, 45, Julie Ann Green, 34, and Iwana Patton, 35?were found within a mile of each other in remote or wooded areas, and they had all suffered a .40-caliber gunshot wound to the head.Gary Ray Bowles, ?I-95? Serial Killer Who Preyed on Gay Men, Executed in FloridaPolice said that after his Sunday arrest, Hayes? DNA was linked to two victims who were murdered between 2005 and 2007. Authorities previously said two of the victims were discovered with semen on their bodies.?At this point in time, we have not charged him yet...but we have linked him with forensic evidence to three of our murder victims,? Daytona Beach Police Chief Craig Capri said Monday, calling Hayes a ?disgusting serial killer.?Police say Hayes may also be responsible for the murder of 30-year-old Stacey Gage, who was found fatally shot behind a church in 2008, but authorities have yet to find forensic evidence tying him to the slaying.?We don?t know at this point in time if it?s related. We?re still investigating that,? Capri said, adding that the multi-county investigation is ?a team effort to get closure for these families and get this killer off the streets.?Authorities previously said Gunther, a painter, was last seen leaving her friend?s house on Dec. 24, 2005. Her partially nude body was found in an alleyway two days later, after she was shot ?execution-style? in the back of the head. Family Sues Man They Say Left Their Daughter to Die on Florida HighwayOn Jan. 14, 2006, her friend Julie Green was reportedly found dead in a ditch at a construction site. Green had also been shot in the back of the head. Patton, a 35-year-old nursing assistant, was killed a month later in a similar fashion, authorities said, and her body was discovered in a remote area off busy Daytona Boulevard. Authorities said Monday that Hayes randomly targeted his victims, but it has been previously reported the three women all had a history of prostitution. Hayes, who was a student at Bethune Cookman University, was interviewed by Daytona homicide detectives in 2006. Capri said he was questioned about purchasing a gun ?around the time of the murders? but there was no ?physical or forensic evidence? linking him to the slayings.Unlike the other victims in Daytona, Bey was fatally strangled and found with multiple broken teeth and a broken jaw. Authorities believe she was dragged to the side of the highway where she was ultimately found on March 7, 2016, by utility workers.Investigators said Hayes moved to Palm Beach County from Daytona Beach around the time of Bey?s murder. Netflix?s Most Dangerous Show Travels Where Only Psychopaths DareThe Florida Department of Law Enforcement credited, DNA tests, genetic genealogy, and the diligence of local authorities for the arrest.  ?Killers like Robert Tyrone Hayes are the reason genetic genealogy is so important to public safety,? FDLE spokesman Troy Walker said on Monday. ?Without genetic genealogy, predators like Mr. Hayes will continue to live in our neighborhoods, visit our parks, our libraries, restaurants, and go to our nightlife and entertainment districts to continue to hunt for victims.?Hayes, who was charged with first-degree murder, was denied bail at his initial court appearance Monday. It is not immediately known if he has a lawyer. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • NYC to Allow 1.1 Million Students to Skip Class for Climate Protests

    NYC to Allow 1.1 Million Students to Skip Class for Climate ProtestsNew York City public schools will allow 1.1 million students  to skip classes Friday in order to attend the planned "climate strike" ahead of the United Nations Climate Action Summit.The protests aim to press the Summit for immediate action to stop climate change, and are geared specifically for the participation of young people.Reactions to the decision have been ecstatic in some cases, as protest organizers contemplate what they hope will be the largest climate change protest in the history of the U.S.?This completely changes things, and it?s our doing,? Xiye Bastida, 17, a senior at Beacon High School in Manhattan, told the New York Times. Some teachers at her school were planning to accompany students to the protests even before the school district granted permission to do so.?We?re not against the school system,? she said. ?We need the schools to work with us because our larger goal is to stop the fossil fuel industry.?


  • Merkel urges return to Iran nuclear deal to defuse Middle East tensions

    Merkel urges return to Iran nuclear deal to defuse Middle East tensionsGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday called for a return to an international deal curbing Iran's nuclear activities as the only way to defuse tensions in the Middle East. "We believe that the deal to stop Iran from acquiring military nuclear capabilities is a building block we need to get back to," Merkel said during a news conference with Jordan's King Abdullah. "But there is also a long list of other burdens coming from Iran like the ballistic missiles program and its engagement in Syria," she said.


  • Jihad, history link Taliban to al-Qaida in Afghanistan

    Jihad, history link Taliban to al-Qaida in AfghanistanThe Taliban promised Washington during months of negotiations that the United States would never again be attacked from Afghan soil. Such a pledge would have included al-Qaida, which planned the 9/11 attacks from inside Afghanistan. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had said the Taliban agreed to cut ties with al-Qaida as part of peace negotiations, which President Donald Trump abruptly called off last week.


  • The Saudi drone attack took out a known weak spot in the oil supply chain with a cheap, low-tech weapon that billions' worth of air defenses are powerless to stop

    The Saudi drone attack took out a known weak spot in the oil supply chain with a cheap, low-tech weapon that billions' worth of air defenses are powerless to stopSaudi Aramco officials said Sunday that 5 million barrels per day had been affected, carving a 5%-sized hole in the world's total oil supply.


  • 'A war zone': Propane explosion kills firefighter, injures 8 others, levels building in Maine

    'A war zone': Propane explosion kills firefighter, injures 8 others, levels building in MaineA firefighter was killed and eight others were injured when a powerful propane explosion destroyed a new building Monday in Farmington, Maine.


  • Is Russia's Crazy Status-6 Nuclear Weapon a Great Idea or a Really Bad One?

    Is Russia's Crazy Status-6 Nuclear Weapon a Great Idea or a Really Bad One?Let's take a look.


  • U.S. to Return Ambassador to Belarus as Minsk Seeks New Friends

    U.S. to Return Ambassador to Belarus as Minsk Seeks New Friends(Bloomberg) -- The U.S. plans to return its ambassador to Belarus, ending a freeze in ties with the authoritarian former Soviet republic which had lasted for more than 11 years.?We are happy to see that chapter closing, and we are closing it because of the concrete steps in the direction that you, Mr. President, had taken to improve this relationship,? David Hale, Undersecretary of State for political affairs, told Alexander Lukashenko during a meeting in Minsk.The U.S. withdrew its ambassador from Minsk in 2008 as relations between the two countries spiralled lower over Washington?s allegations of human-rights abuses by the Belarusian government. In 2006, Lukashenko was subjected to U.S. sanctions, which remain in place.Amid rising tensions in recent months with his main ally and patron, Russia, Lukashenko has sought to rebuild ties with the U.S. and Europe. Moscow has pushed for closer links under a longstanding agreement to form a union state, but Minsk has been reluctant to give in too much to its much larger neighbor. The U.S., meanwhile, has sought to limit Russia?s sway over its neighbors.Hale said the U.S. strongly supports Belarus? sovereignty and independence. Lukashenko told the U.S. diplomat he wouldn?t allow the deployment of short- or medium-range missiles in his country -- something Russia has suggested it might do in response to threatened U.S. military moves in Europe -- but only if doing that didn?t undermine Belarus? security.To contact the reporter on this story: Aliaksandr Kudrytski in Minsk, Belarus at akudrytski@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Balazs Penz at bpenz@bloomberg.net, Gregory L. White, Torrey ClarkFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comİ2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Hurricane Humberto: Storm strengthens to hurricane, moves toward Bermuda

    Hurricane Humberto: Storm strengthens to hurricane, moves toward BermudaHumberto reached hurricane strength late Sunday night, according to the National Hurricane Center.


  • War at the dinner table: Hong Kong families divided over protests

    War at the dinner table: Hong Kong families divided over protestsFor weeks, Jane lied to her mother about joining Hong Kong's protests -- pretending her rucksack was bulging with books, not supplies -- until the ideological rift between them grew so great she had to move out. With millions marching to protest stuttering freedoms under Beijing's rule over the last 100 days, Jane found herself increasingly arguing with her mother who was bitterly opposed to the pro-democracy movement. "Hong Kong flats are small.


  • Edward Snowden Is Exposing His Own Secrets This Time

    Edward Snowden Is Exposing His Own Secrets This TimeBarton GellmanEdward Snowden doesn?t share new state secrets in his memoir, Permanent Record, which The Daily Beast obtained a copy of ahead of its release Tuesday. But he does offer some personal ones, from his transformation into America?s most famous secret-spiller, to the news that he was married, two years ago, to Lindsay Mills, the girlfriend he left behind when he fled the U.S. for Hong Kong with a virtual library of top secret files detailing America?s global electronic spying apparatus.After enlisting in the Army at 21, Snowden writes that he was on a track called ?18 X-Ray?, with a chance to come out of training as a Special Forces sergeant, before breaking his leg at Fort Benning and receiving an administrative separation. ?I had hoped to serve my country,? he writes, as his family had before him, ?but instead I went to work for it? as a contractor for the intelligence community. That was effectively a cover, in his telling, as ?the agencies were hiring tech companies to hire kids, and then giving them the keys to the kingdom because? no one else knew how the keys, or the kingdom worked.? He elaborates: ?Here is one thing that the disorganized CIA didn?t quite understand at the time, and that no major American employed outside of Silicon Valley understood, either: The computer guy knows everything, or rather can know everything.?Eventually, Snowden, having attained the security clearances necessary for his tech work, ?went govvy? and signed up for a straight CIA job. He joined class 6-06 of the BTTP, or the Basic Telecommunications Training Program that ?disguises one of the most classified and unusual curricula in existence? to train TISOs (Technical Information Security Officers),? who work under State Department cover to ?manage the technical infrastructure for CIA operations, most commonly hidden at stations inside American missions, consulates, and embassies.? ?[T]he worst-kept secret in modern diplomacy is that the primary function of an embassy nowadays is to serve as a platform for espionage,? he writes.After being stationed in Vienna, Snowden moved to Tokyo in 2009 to work as a systems analyst for the NSA, he writes, though nominally as an employee of Dell. ?Two things about the NSA stunned me right off the bat: how technologically sophisticated it was compared with the CIA, and how much less vigilant it was about security in its every iteration,? he writes, noting that the NSA ?hardly bothered to encrypt anything.?While working there on a project called EPICSHELTER??a backup and storage system that would act as a shadow NSA: a complete, automated, and constantly updating copy of all the agency?s most important material, which would allow the agency to reboot and be up and running again, with all its archives intact, even if Fort Meade were reduced to smoldering rubble??Snowden began researching China?s domestic surveillance system, which led to his first inkling that if such systems were possible, the U.S. might be using them too, given ?perhaps the fundamental rule of technological progress:. if something can be done, it probably will be done, and possibly already has been.?That same summer, the U.S. released its Unclassified Report on the President?s Surveillance Program, following the New York Times? reporting on the Bush-era warrantless wiretapping program. Eventually, Snowden writes, he found the classified version, ?filed in an Exceptionally Controlled Information (ECI) compartment, an extremely rare classification used to make sure something would remain hidden even from those holding top secret clearance? The report?s full classification designation was TOP SECRET//STLW//HCS//COMINT//ORCORN//NOFORN, which translates to: pretty much only a few dozen people in the world are allowed the read this.?Snowden found it only because the STLW classification?for STELLARWIND?had raised a red flag for him as a system administrator, meaning he had to examine the file to determine what it was and how best to scrub it from the system where it wasn?t supposed to have been placed.   ?It was clear that the unclassified version I was already familiar with wasn?t a redaction of the classified report, as would usually be the practice,? he writes. ?Rather, it was a wholly different document, which the classified version immediately exposed as an outright and carefully concocted lie? to hide the transformation of the NSA?s mission ?from using technology to defend America to using technology to control it by redefining citizens? private Internet communications as potential signals intelligence.?STELLARWIND, the classified report revealed, had been collecting communications in the U.S. since 2001, and continued even after Justice Department lawyers secretly objected to it in 2004. It?s longevity owed everything to a kafkaesque legal position adopted by the Bush administration, ?that the NSA could collect whatever communication records it wanted to, without having to get a warrant, because it could only be said to have acquired or obtained them, in the legal sense, if and when the agency ?searched and retrieved? them from its database.?Having found the big secret, set up so that no one else knew it was there to even start asking questions, Snowden writes, he began using his access as a systems engineer and administrator to ask those questions, while keeping the knowledge a secret from his girlfriend and his family, and considering what to do about it. Back in the US in 2011, Snowden experienced his first epileptic seizure. The following year on a contract with Dell again, he returned to the NSA, at its Kunia Regional Security Operations Center in Hawaii. There, he writes, ?my active searching out of NSA abuses began not with the copying of documents, but with the reading of them.? As the sole employee of the Office of Information Sharing, he was developing an automated ?readboard? to scan the IC?s own internal internet and create a custom digital magazine for each employee, based on his or her interests and security clearances. He called the system Heartbeat, and its servers stored a copy of each scanned document, ?making it easy for me to perform the kind of deep interagency searches that the heads of most agencies could only dream of.? Heartbeat, he writes, ?was the source of nearly all of the documents that I later disclosed to journalists.?Snowden mentions a rare public speech Ira ?Gus? Hunt, the CIA?s chief technology officer, delivered a week after then-Director of National Intelligence James Clapper had lied to Congress about the NSA?s collection of bulk communications. In the speech, covered only by the Huffington Post, Hunt flatly declared that we ?try to collect everything and hang on to it forever.? ?You?re already a walking sensor platform,? he said. ?It is nearly within our grasp to be able to compute on all human generated information?). As Snowden notes, a video of the talk has less than 1,000 views. After that, Snowden recounts his efforts to reach out to journalists, and to carefully hide his digital breadcrumbs by encrypting data and distributing the keys to it, while perhaps hiding his findings on SD cards inside of Rubik?s Cube cubes to get them out of the NSA?s underground tunnel in Hawaii.He then took what he saw as a less prestigious new position to gain access to the XKEYSCORE system, which he?d learned about but not used himself, and, he writes, is ?perhaps best understood as a search engine that lets an analyst search through the records of your life.??It was, simply put, the closest thing to science fiction I?ve ever seen in science fact,? he writes, allowing users to put in someone?s basic information and then go through their online history, even playing back recordings of their online settings and watching people as they searched, character by character. ?Everyone?s communications were in the system?everyone?s,? including the president?s, he writes. The potential for abuse was obvious. NSA workers even had a word, ?LOVEINT? for ?love intelligence,? to describe analysts cyber-stalking current, former and prospective lovers, while among male analysts ?intercepted nudes were a kind of informal office currency,? Snowden writes. ?This was how you knew you could trust each other: you had shared in one another?s crimes.?Finally, Snowden recounts his trip to Hong Kong, after taking a medical leave, his efforts to reach Ecuador, and his exile in Russia, where he was finally reunited with Lindsay (whose diary entries recounting his disappearance, and the pressure then placed on her by U.S. authorities are given a full, moving chapter. Snowden speaks well of a very different leaker, Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, writing that while ?people have long ascribed selfish motives to Assange?s desire to give me aid, I believe he was genuinely motivated in one thing above all?helping me evade capture? It?s true that Assange can be self-interested and vain, moody, and even bullying?after a sharp disagreement just a month after our first, text-based communication, I never communicated with him again?but he also sincerely conceives of himself as a fighter in a historic battle for the public?s right to know, a battle he will do anything to win.? ?Most important to [Assange],? writes Snowden, ?was the opportunity to establish a counter-example to the case of the organization?s most famous source, US Army Private Chelsea Manning, whose thirty-five-year prison sentence was historically unprecedented and a monstrous deterrent to whistleblowers everywhere.?Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • Divided Fed set to cut interest rates this week, but then what?

    Divided Fed set to cut interest rates this week, but then what?Deep disagreements within the Federal Reserve over the economic outlook and how the U.S. central bank should respond will not stop policymakers from cutting interest rates at a two-day meeting that began on Tuesday. An oil price spike after attacks on Saudi Arabian oil facilities over the weekend added to the list of risks facing an economy already slowed by ongoing trade tensions and global weakness. At one end of the Fed's large boardroom table sit St. Louis Fed President James Bullard and Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari, who are expected to argue for a steep reduction in borrowing costs to counter low inflation and an inverted Treasury yield curve.


  • Wisconsin man accused of making THC cartridges charged

    Wisconsin man accused of making THC cartridges chargedA Wisconsin man suspected of running an illegal operation to manufacture vaping cartridges flew to California last month to get THC oil in bulk to fill thousands of cartridges to sell, prosecutors said Monday in charging documents. Authorities in Kenosha, Wisconsin, arrested 20-year-old Tyler Huffhines on Sept. 5 after parents tipped off police when they saw their teenage son with one of the cartridges. Prosecutors say Huffhines employed 10 people to fill the cartridges with THC oil at a condo he rented with a stolen identity.


  • Saudi oil attacks: Why would Iran strike now?

    Saudi oil attacks: Why would Iran strike now?Who launched the attack? The Houthi militia in Yemen - who are backed and supplied by Iran - initially claimed the attack. But experts and officials are not convinced the grpup has the organisational or operational capability. The US and Saudi Arabia claim they have evidence that Iranian weapons were used and satellite images released by the US reportedly suggested the attack had come from the northwest direction. Why would Iran launch an attack now? As talks with EU members over the ailing nuclear deal stall, Iran needs to show the world the consequences of returning it to its pariah status. While Tehran may be suffering under sanctions, Saturday?s attack shows it still has the capability to cause a great deal of damage to its foes in the region.  The strikes hit the Saudi kingdom where it hurt the most - its lucrative oil industry, with the knock-on effect on global crude prices. Strikes against Saudi oil plants What will happen to global oil supply? The consequences of the attack are likely to be short lived but depend on the capacity - and willingness - of other producers to pick up the slack.  Venezuela and Libya are unable to do so and Iran is constrained by US sanctions. Other Opec members and Russia are not rushing to turn on the taps, happy to enjoy higher prices while they can.  Neither can the US - now the world's biggest oil producer due to the shale boom - quickly ramp up supplies as export facilities are not up to scratch.  What might a retaliatory attack look like? Riyadh may decide it needs to respond in some limited way to save face considering the gravity of the attack on its soil. If it does, that would probably mean a tit-for-tat, proportionate strike on Iranian energy facilities such as oil refineries. And, that, in turn, would lead to an Iranian response. In a phone call with the US president, the Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman made clear the kingdom was "willing and able to confront and deal with this terrorist aggression."     What does this mean for the possibility of US talks with Iran?  Donald Trump had previously indicated a willingness to meet with Iranian leaders with "no preconditions". That had led to anticipation of a meeting with Hassan Rouhani, the Iranian president, on the sidelines of the UN general assembly next week. The recent departure of Iran hawk John Bolton as Mr Trump's national security adviser had also seemed to make a meeting more possible. However, following the Saudi oil attack, Iran's foreign ministry said: "This meeting will not happen." And Mr Trump said it was now "incorrect" that he was willing to meet with "no conditions."


  • Obama?s team lines up to defend Andrew McCabe in court

    Obama?s team lines up to defend Andrew McCabe in courtObama-era national security leaders would testify on behalf of McCabe should he face trial over allegations that he misled officials about leaks to the media.


  • Middle East Mystery Theater: Who Attacked Saudi Arabia's Oil Supply?

    Middle East Mystery Theater: Who Attacked Saudi Arabia's Oil Supply?The United States doesn't know how to respond to the attack on its ally's oil plant?or who to hold responsible for it.


  • Wisconsin brothers charged with operating counterfeit vaping cartridge operation

    Wisconsin brothers charged with operating counterfeit vaping cartridge operationTyler and Jacob Huffhines ran an operation that cranked out 3,000 to 5,000 counterfeit vaping cartridges each day, authorities say.


  • The Future of Design: Transportation

    The Future of Design: Transportation


  • Police clear major migrant camp in northern France

    Police clear major migrant camp in northern FranceGrande-Synthe (France) (AFP) - French police began clearing around 1,000 migrants from a gymnasium near the northern port of Dunkirk on Tuesday after a court ruled it was a health and security hazard. The mayor of Grande-Synthe in December 2018 opened up the sports hall to migrant families seeking shelter from the cold. Since then, it has grown into a makeshift camp with around 800 people sleeping in tents pitched around the crammed gymnasium where some 170 people, mostly Iraqi Kurds hoping to reach Britain, had been sheltering.


  • More than half of teens say they're 'afraid' and 'angry' about climate change ? and 1 in 4 of them are doing something about it

    More than half of teens say they're 'afraid' and 'angry' about climate change ? and 1 in 4 of them are doing something about itTeenagers in the US are afraid of climate change but are also increasingly participating in activist activity, according to a new poll.


  • Russia says unacceptable to discuss retaliation to Saudi attacks

    Russia says unacceptable to discuss retaliation to Saudi attacksRussia's foreign ministry said on Monday it was unacceptable to discuss a possible retaliation to the attacks on Saudi oil facilities and that to use the incident to increase tensions around Iran was counterproductive. "We believe it is counterproductive to use what happened to increase tensions around Iran in line with the well-known U.S. policy," the ministry said in a statement. "Proposals on tough retaliatory actions, which appear to have been discussed in Washington are even more unacceptable," the ministry said.


  • The Latest: Arrested man is from wealthy Mexican family

    The Latest: Arrested man is from wealthy Mexican familyProperty records show that a man arrested on manslaughter charges after his 11-year-old son was thrown overboard from a boat and killed by the vessel is a member of one of the richest and most powerful families in Mexico. Records obtained by The Associated Press show the full name of the man police identified as Javier Burillo is Javier Burillo Azcarraga. Tiburon Police Chief Michael Cronin said Monday that the real estate developer is a well-known and liked member of the Tiburon-Belvedere community but Cronin wouldn't give any other details about him or the incident.


  • Osama bin Laden's youngest son, Hamza, had taken up terrorism to 'avenge' his notorious father

    Osama bin Laden's youngest son, Hamza, had taken up terrorism to 'avenge' his notorious fatherHamza bin Laden, the son and presumed heir of Osama bin Laden to lead Al Qaeda, was killed by a US operation in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region.


  • Dad of Parkland shooting victim says taking guns away isn't the answer

    Dad of Parkland shooting victim says taking guns away isn't the answerThe father of a Parkland shooting victim reacts to 2020 Democrat Beto O'Rourke's push for a mandatory gun buyback.


  • Back in 2015, Iran Practiced Sinking a U.S. Navy Aircraft Carrier

    Back in 2015, Iran Practiced Sinking a U.S. Navy Aircraft CarrierCould this become a reality?


  • California Bans State-Sponsored Travel to Iowa over Refusal to Provide Medicaid Coverage for Gender-Reassignment Surgeries

    California Bans State-Sponsored Travel to Iowa over Refusal to Provide Medicaid Coverage for Gender-Reassignment SurgeriesCalifornia added an eleventh state to its travel blacklist on Friday, banning state-sponsored travel to Iowa over that state's refusal to cover gender-transition surgeries under its Medicaid program.California attorney general Xavier Becerra announced the decision to add Iowa to the travel-ban list, which takes effect October 4 and means public employees and college students will not be able to travel to Iowa on the taxpayer's dime.In May, Iowa governor Kim Reynolds signed a law blocking Medicaid from paying for gender-reassignment surgeries despite the state Supreme Court's ruling earlier this year in favor of charging taxpayers for the procedures. Gender identity is a protected characteristic under Iowa's Civil Rights Act."The Iowa Legislature has reversed course on what was settled law under the Iowa Civil Rights Act, repealing protections for those seeking gender-affirming healthcare," Becerra said in a statement. "California has taken an unambiguous stand against discrimination and government actions that would enable it."California's travel blacklist stems from a 2016 law allowing the Golden State to ban state travel to other U.S. states that roll back protections for LGBT citizens. Texas, Oklahoma, North Carolina, Mississippi, and Kentucky are also on the list.


  • Putin Loses Legendary Approval-Rating Crown to His New Neighbor

    Putin Loses Legendary Approval-Rating Crown to His New Neighbor(Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Vladimir Putin takes great pride in his sky-high approval rating. But with Muscovites rising up and a new government instilling hope in Ukraine, he?s being outshone by the president next door, Volodymyr Zelenskiy.It?s still early days for the administration in Kyiv. While pushing a raft of popular reforms, Zelenskiy, 41, remains in his honeymoon period, while cries he?s too close to a local billionaire grow louder.The 66-year-old Putin, meanwhile, is approaching two decades as Russia?s leader. Economic expansion has fizzled out, and along with it the spending largess that kept the masses happy.The last time his popularity sagged meaningfully, Putin famously got a boost after annexing Crimea from Ukraine and fomenting a war between the two former allies.Zelenskiy has a long way to go to match the 89% rating Putin reached back then.To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Langley in London at alangley1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Andrea Dudik at adudik@bloomberg.net, Gregory L. WhiteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comİ2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Qatar announces new residency scheme for investors

    Qatar announces new residency scheme for investorsQatar announced Monday it will grant residency to foreign investors for the first time, state media reported, the latest in a series of measures designed to diversify the economy. Foreigners investing an unspecified level of "non-Qatari capital" in the economy will be eligible for renewable five-year residency permits, the state-run Qatar News Agency reported. Real estate developers active in Qatar's property market will also be eligible for the scheme, under the new law.


  • Boy Scout leader sang naked in front of kids, and organization failed to investigate: Lawsuit

    Boy Scout leader sang naked in front of kids, and organization failed to investigate: LawsuitA Boy Scout leader who was accused of singing naked in front of several young boys was not investigated by his troop despite multiple complaints.


  • U.N. Security Council overcomes Chinese veto threat to renew Afghanistan mission

    U.N. Security Council overcomes Chinese veto threat to renew Afghanistan missionThe United Nations Security Council unanimously agreed on Tuesday to extend a U.N. political mission in Afghanistan after last-minute talks overcame a Chinese threat to veto if there was no reference to Beijing's global Belt and Road infrastructure project. The resolutions mandating the mission in 2016, 2017 and 2018 all included a reference welcoming and urging efforts like China's Belt and Road initiative to facilitate trade and transit, but in March the United States and some other council members said they could no longer accept that language. The council agreed then to a six month rollover of the mandate of the U.N. mission, known as UNAMA, and that expires on Tuesday.


  • Mexico: 5 shot dead in Tabasco bar amid holiday celebrations

    Mexico: 5 shot dead in Tabasco bar amid holiday celebrationsThe prosecutor's office in the Gulf coast state of Tabasco said in a statement that the victims were all adult males, three of them brothers. It added that the attack took place in Rio Tinto, outside the state capital of Villahermosa. The federal Department of Security and Citizen Protection had said previously that the shootings happened in Villahermosa.


  • A flight from Vietnam to South Korea was delayed for 11 hours after the pilot arrived at the airport and realized he had lost his passport

    A flight from Vietnam to South Korea was delayed for 11 hours after the pilot arrived at the airport and realized he had lost his passportT'Way Air said it was investigating the incident and how the pilot lost his passport, and that it put passengers in a hotel and fed them breakfast.


  • Canada decides: Trudeau faces charge he's undermined support for immigration

    Canada decides: Trudeau faces charge he's undermined support for immigrationA recent spike in irregular border crossings threatens to upend a decades-long, bipartisan consensus on immigration.


  • Fall-Flavored Cocktails, From Pecan Pie Martinis to Pumpkin Pie Sangria

    Fall-Flavored Cocktails, From Pecan Pie Martinis to Pumpkin Pie Sangria


  • See This A-10 Warthog? It Could Wipe Out Iran's Swarm Boats in a War

    See This A-10 Warthog? It Could Wipe Out Iran's Swarm Boats in a WarAt least that is the plan.


  • Triple threat: Tropical Storm Imelda to swamp Texas, Humberto nears Bermuda and TD 10 forms in Atlantic

    Triple threat: Tropical Storm Imelda to swamp Texas, Humberto nears Bermuda and TD 10 forms in AtlanticWhile Hurricane Humberto nears Bermuda, there's flooding in Texas due to Tropical Storm Imelda and Tropical Depression 10 is spinning up in the Atlantic