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  • Trump has sparked a shift in how some conservatives talk and think about abortion

    Trump has sparked a shift in how some conservatives talk and think about abortionThere is a robust argument being made, by prominent public figures but also among everyday Americans, that the white evangelical movement has made a Faustian bargain by supporting the GOP, and President Trump, in exchange for promises to eliminate abortion.


  • Joe Biden supporter who was installing BLM sign arrested for allegedly shooting at passing Trump supporter and son

    Joe Biden supporter who was installing BLM sign arrested for allegedly shooting at passing Trump supporter and sonNeighbours said the political signs supporting Democrats had been previously pulled down on multiple occasions


  • Marines remove general investigated over alleged racial slur

    Marines remove general investigated over alleged racial slurThe Marine Corps has removed a two-star general from command of Marine forces in Europe and Africa based on an investigation into allegations that he used a racial slur during a training event, officials said Tuesday. The decision to relieve Maj. Gen. Stephen Neary of command of Marine Corps Forces Europe and Africa, headquartered in Germany, was made by the commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. David Berger. ?Neary was relieved due to a loss of trust and confidence in his ability to serve in command,? the Marines said in a brief written statement.


  • Ghislaine Maxwell Deposition, Discussing Sex Life and Jeffrey Epstein, Ordered Released by Thursday at 9 a.m.

    Ghislaine Maxwell Deposition, Discussing Sex Life and Jeffrey Epstein, Ordered Released by Thursday at 9 a.m.Transcripts of interviews conducted with alleged sex trafficker Ghislaine Maxwell that referenced her former boyfriend, the dead pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, and contain intimate details about her sex life, should be made public no later than 9 a.m. ET Thursday, a New York judge ordered Tuesday.The controversial transcripts, long sought-after by some of Epstein?s victims and the media, are expected to shine an unprecedented light on Maxwell and Epstein?s life together and come from two days of depositions in 2016 for a since-settled libel case filed against Maxwell by Epstein accuser Virginia Roberts Giuffre. Maxwell?s legal team has argued the deposition contains ?intimate? information about her sex life and other personal matters. Federal prosecutors say they believe Maxwell may have perjured herself during the testimony.The transcripts run to more than 400 pages.Tuesday?s order by District Judge Loretta Preska marks what appears to be a final and resounding defeat to Maxwell?s persistent attempts to keep the deposition secret. On Monday, the Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan ruled that Preska properly decided that the public had a right to access documents from legal proceedings and that transcripts should be unsealed because arguments by Maxwell?s lawyers were meritless.Her lawyers have argued that the unsealing of the deposition could interfere with Maxwell getting a fair trial next year; Preska has firmly come down on the side of those seeking its unsealing. Preska on Tuesday gave Maxwell?s team an opportunity to make ?minimal redactions? to block personally identifiable information that would reveal the names of non-parties or their families, but directed ?the material previously ordered unsealed shall be posted on the docket no later than 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, October 22, 2020.? Before Maxwell pleaded not guilty to charges of aiding Epstein?s sexual abuse and committing perjury this year, she was sued by Epstein accuser Virginia Roberts Giuffre for defamation in 2015, after Maxwell denied Giuffre?s claims of abuse.The civil case was settled in 2017, but Maxwell?s April 2016 testimony in that case will now, despite her lawyers? best efforts, be made public.According to court papers previously filed by her lawyers, in the deposition Maxwell made statements about ?consensual, and intimate conduct with other adults.?Maxwell has been incarcerated since her arrest at a luxury mansion in New Hampshire in early July after dodging police for several months. She is being held at Brooklyn?s Metropolitan Detention Center after she was denied bail in July.If convicted, she could face as much as 35 years in prison.Epstein, 66, was arrested and charged with sex trafficking. He died by suicide in August 2019 at a federal jail in Manhattan.In 2008 in Florida, Epstein pleaded guilty to state charges of soliciting and procuring a person under age 18 for prostitution. He spent 13 months in jail, paid settlements to victims, and remained a registered sex offender.?An earlier version of this report inaccurately said the Maxwell deposition would be released at 9 a.m. Thursday. The judge?s ruling states it must be made public by that time.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • Where recreational marijuana is legal, data show minimal impacts on teen use and traffic deaths

    Where recreational marijuana is legal, data show minimal impacts on teen use and traffic deathsAs voters consider recreational legalization, the outcomes of legal marijuana in Colorado, Washington and California help show what would happen.


  • ?She hit her face!? Watch a Delta passenger smack a flight attendant on board plane

    ?She hit her face!? Watch a Delta passenger smack a flight attendant on board planeAnother day, another on-board confrontation.


  • US Army base claims its Twitter account was hacked after suggestively tweeting at an OnlyFans creator

    US Army base claims its Twitter account was hacked after suggestively tweeting at an OnlyFans creator"Our account was hacked. We apologize to our followers," the US Army's Ft. Bragg said on Twitter before the account was deactivated.


  • Electoral college explained: how Biden faces an uphill battle in the US election

    Electoral college explained: how Biden faces an uphill battle in the US electionTrump won the presidency in 2016 despite Clinton receiving almost 3m more votes, all because of the electoral college. How does the system work? Who elects the US president?When Americans cast their ballots for the US president, they are actually voting for a representative of that candidate?s party known as an elector. There are 538 electors who then vote for the president on behalf of the people in their state.Each state is assigned a certain number of these electoral votes, based on the number of congressional districts they have, plus two additional votes representing the state?s Senate seats. Washington DC is also assigned three electoral votes, despite having no voting representation in Congress. A majority of 270 of these votes is needed to win the presidency.The process of nominating electors varies by state and by party, but is generally done one of two ways. Ahead of the election, political parties either choose electors at their national conventions, or they are voted for by the party?s central committee.The electoral college nearly always operates with a winner-takes-all system, in which the candidate with the highest number of votes in a state claims all of that state?s electoral votes. For example, in 2016, Trump beat Clinton in Florida by a margin of just 2.2%, but that meant he claimed all 29 of Florida?s crucial electoral votes.Such small margins in a handful of key swing states meant that, regardless of Clinton?s national vote lead, Trump was able to clinch victory in several swing states and therefore win more electoral college votes. Biden could face the same hurdle in November, meaning he will need to focus his attention on a handful of battleground states to win the presidency.A chart showing electoral college votes by state The unequal distribution of electoral votesWhile the number of electoral votes a state is assigned somewhat reflects its population, the minimum of three votes per state means that the relative value of electoral votes varies across America.The least populous states like North and South Dakota and the smaller states of New England are overrepresented because of the required minimum of three electoral votes. Meanwhile, the states with the most people ? California, Texas and Florida ? are underrepresented in the electoral college.Wyoming has one electoral college vote for every 193,000 people, compared with California?s rate of one electoral vote per 718,000 people. This means that each electoral vote in California represents over three times as many people as one in Wyoming. These disparities are repeated across the country. A visual of population per electoral vote by state Who does it favour?Experts have warned that, after returning two presidents that got fewer votes than their opponents since 2000, the electoral college is flawed.In 2000, Al Gore won over half a million more votes than Bush, yet Bush became president after winning Florida by just 537 votes. In all, the US has had five presidents who lost the overall popular vote but won the election.A chart showing recent election outcomes by popular vote and electoral college marginsProfessor George Edwards III, at Texas A&M University, said: ?The electoral college violates the core tenet of democracy, that all votes count equally and allows the candidate finishing second to win the election. Why hold an election if we do not care who received the most votes??At the moment, the electoral college favours Republicans because of the way Republican votes are distributed across the country. They are more likely to occur in states that are closely divided between the parties.?Under the winner-takes-all system, the margin of victory in a state becomes irrelevant. In 2016, Clinton?s substantial margins in states such as California and New York failed to earn her enough electoral votes, while close races in the battleground states of Pennsylvania and Michigan took Trump over the 270 majority.A visual showing margins and electoral votes by state gained by Trump and Clinton in 2016As candidates easily win the electoral votes of their solid states, the election plays out in a handful of key battlegrounds. In 2016, Trump won six such states - Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin ? adding 99 electoral votes to his total.The demographics of these states differ from the national average. They are older, have more white voters without college degrees, and often have smaller non-white populations. These characteristics generally favour Republicans, and made up the base of Trump?s votes in 2016.For example, 67% of non-college-educated white people voted for Trump in 2016. In all six swing states, this demographic is overrepresented by at least six percentage points more than the national average.default The alternativesSeveral alternative systems for electing the president have been proposed and grown in favour, as many seek to change or abolish the electoral college.Two states ? Maine and Nebraska ? already use a different method of assigning their electoral college votes. The two ?Senate? votes go to the state-wide popular vote winner, but the remaining district votes are awarded to the winner of that district. However, implementing this congressional district method across the country could result in greater bias than the current system. The popular vote winner could still lose the election, and the distribution of voters would still strongly favour Republicans.The National Popular Vote Compact (NPVC) is another option, in which each state would award all of its electoral college votes in line with the national popular vote. If enough states signed up to this agreement to reach the 270 majority, the candidate who gained the most votes nationwide would always win the presidency.However, the NPVC has more practical issues. Professor Norman Williams, from Willamette University, questioned how a nationwide recount would be carried out under the NPVC, and said that partisanship highlighted its major flaws. Only Democratic states are currently signed up, but support could simply switch in the future if a Republican candidate faces winning the popular vote but not the presidency.The NPVC is a solution that would elect the president with the most votes without the difficulty of abolishing the electoral college that is enshrined in the constitution.The current system is also vulnerable to distorted outcomes through actions such as gerrymandering. This practice involves precisely redrawing the borders of districts to concentrate support in favour of a party. The result being abnormally shaped districts that disenfranchise certain groups of voters. Today, an amendment that would replace the college with a direct national popular vote is seen by many as the fairest electoral system.According to Professor Edwards III, ?There is only one appropriate way to elect the president: add up all the votes and declare the candidate receiving the most votes the winner.?default


  • British study finds traits tied to enduring COVID-19 symptoms

    British study finds traits tied to enduring COVID-19 symptomsMost people recover from COVID-19 within four weeks, but one in 20 patients is still ill after eight weeks and one in 40 continues to have symptoms after 12 weeks, a new study from Kings College London found, according to BBC News. The researchers pored over self-reported data in the COVID Symptoms Study app, looking for patterns that could predict if a patient who contracts the new coronavirus will have "long COVID" or recover more rapidly. They found several traits that appeared to increase the risk of longer-lasting COVID-19."Having more than five different symptoms in the first week was one of the key risk factors," Dr. Claire Steves at Kings College London told BBC News. Patients with a cough, diarrhea, loss of taste and smell, headaches, and fatigue would be at higher risk than somebody with just a cough, for example. People over 50 also had increased odds of long COVID, as did people with asthma or lung disease, and women."We've seen from the early data coming out that men were at much more risk of very severe disease and sadly of dying from COVID, it appears that women are more at risk of long COVID." Steves said. There are no set symptoms for long COVID, but fatigue is common, BBC News notes. You can find more examples in this new PSA on long COVID from Britain's Department of Health and Social Care. More stories from theweek.com The left embraces rigging democracy The greatest risk for a Biden administration A new constitution? Be careful what you wish for.


  • The 2021 IKEA Catalog Is Finally Here!

  • Trump and Biden election apps ?compromised' by hackers days after president told rally ?nobody gets hacked?

    Trump and Biden election apps ?compromised' by hackers days after president told rally ?nobody gets hacked?A trio of Dutch hackers in 2016 claimed to have president?s Twitter account


  • 3 killed, 1 person in critical condition after Texas club shooting

    3 killed, 1 person in critical condition after Texas club shootingA shooting in a Texas club left three dead and a fourth critically injured, police said, hours after another incident in which an officer was shot dead.


  • Trump supporter launches furious rant at Starbucks barista

    Trump supporter launches furious rant at Starbucks baristaThis week a Trump supporter went viral for all the wrong reasons after video surfaced of her yelling anti-Black Lives Matter rhetoric at a Starbucks barista in Santee, California. The clip ? which was taken by a concerned customer ? shows the agitated woman getting into a heated war of words with barista Alex Beckom, 19, after being politely asked her to wear the Trump 2020 mask under her chin, correctly over her face. Instead of leaving quietly, the woman then accused the coffee shop employee of discriminating against her for her political views as a supporter of the president.


  • Juror in Breonna Taylor case said grand jury didn't agree fatal shooting was justified

    Juror in Breonna Taylor case said grand jury didn't agree fatal shooting was justifiedThe statement came after a judge ordered records in the proceedings released to show if "publicly elected officials are being honest."


  • Australian soldiers killed Afghan prisoner as only six could fit on American helicopter, US marine claims

    Australian soldiers killed Afghan prisoner as only six could fit on American helicopter, US marine claimsA United States Marine Corps helicopter crew chief has accused Australian special forces of shooting dead one of seven bound Afghan prisoners because there was only space for six on the US aircraft due to collect them. The chief, ?Josh?, flew 159 combat missions for the Marine Corps? Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469. He told Australia's ABC Investigations he was a door gunner providing aerial covering fire for the Australian soldiers of the 2nd Commando Regiment during a night raid in mid-2012, north of his squadron?s base in Afghanistan's Helmand Province. The raid was part of a broader joint Australian special forces-US Drug Enforcement Administration campaign targetting drug operations financing the Taliban. Josh told the ABC: ?We just watched them tackle and hogtie these guys and we knew their hands were tied behind their backs?. He said the Australian commandos then called for the US aircraft to pick them and seven prisoners up. ?The pilot said, 'That's too many people, we can't carry that many passengers.' And you just heard this silence and then we heard a pop. And then they said, 'OK, we have six prisoners'.? The USMC chief said it was ?apparent to everybody involved in that mission that they had just killed a prisoner that we had just watched them catch and hogtie?.


  • AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine trial Brazil volunteer dies, trial to continue

    AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine trial Brazil volunteer dies, trial to continueBrazilian health authority Anvisa said on Wednesday that a volunteer in a clinical trial of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University had died but added that the trial would continue. Oxford confirmed the plan to keep testing, saying in a statement that after careful assessment "there have been no concerns about safety of the clinical trial." AstraZeneca declined to comment immediately.


  • Why the US Supreme Court letting Pennsylvania's extended ballot deadline stand is one of its most important decisions this year

    Why the US Supreme Court letting Pennsylvania's extended ballot deadline stand is one of its most important decisions this yearIt could prevent thousands of votes from being rejected, but Barrett being on the court might have swayed the decision in the other direction.


  • Iran breaks its record for most new virus cases in one day

    Iran breaks its record for most new virus cases in one dayIran on Tuesday reported its highest single-day toll of new coronavirus cases since the start of the pandemic with more than 5,000 new infections, as the country struggles to cope with a surge in transmission. Iran?s health ministry also reported that 322 people had died from the virus, pushing the death toll over 31,000. Health minister Saeed Namaki made a dramatic appeal for people to follow health guidance measures, saying that without public help, ?the pandemic in this country will not get better and we'll have to collect the bodies," the semi-official ISNA news agency reported.


  • Fake naked photos of thousands of women shared online

    Fake naked photos of thousands of women shared onlineFake naked images of thousands of women are being made from social media photos.


  • Hunter Biden emails were reportedly shopped around in Ukraine for $5 million, while Giuliani met with officials and businessmen there last year

    Hunter Biden emails were reportedly shopped around in Ukraine for $5 million, while Giuliani met with officials and businessmen there last yearTwo people told Time that they were approached with the emails, and one said the person making the offer already had a buyer in mind, Trump's allies.


  • Record-setting catch of 110-pound catfish in Georgia has angler under fire. Here?s why

    Record-setting catch of 110-pound catfish in Georgia has angler under fire. Here?s whySome aren?t happy about what happened to the catfish


  • Letters to the Editor: USC is taking strong action against anti-Semitism and other forms of hate

    Letters to the Editor: USC is taking strong action against anti-Semitism and other forms of hateAn ugly fight over social media about racism at USC had one positive outcome: the university president's strong statement condemning anti-Semitism.


  • A jailed Philippine activist is forced to attend her infant's funeral in handcuffs and a hazmat suit

    A jailed Philippine activist is forced to attend her infant's funeral in handcuffs and a hazmat suitThe death of Reina Mae Nasino's 3-month-old daughter, River, has sparked an uproar over President Rodrigo Duterte's crackdown on human rights defenders. The underweight infant was separated from her mother, denying her breast milk that could have prolonged her life.


  • US and Russia Scramble Jets in Another Exchange of Aerial Intercepts

  • AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine trial continues despite Brazilian volunteer death

    AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine trial continues despite Brazilian volunteer deathBrazilian health authority Anvisa said on Wednesday that a volunteer in a clinical trial of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University had died but added that the trial would continue.


  • 26 Neutral Rugs That Make the Case for Beige

  • Human remains found in search for Tulsa massacre victims

    Human remains found in search for Tulsa massacre victimsOne set of human remains, and perhaps a second, have been found in a Tulsa cemetery where investigators are searching for victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, Oklahoma state archaeologist Kary Stackelbeck said Tuesday. ?We do have one confirmed individual and the possibility of a second? body found, Stackelbeck said. The confirmed human remains were found little more than 3 feet (90 centimeters) underground in an area known as the ?Original 18,? where funeral home records show massacre victims are buried.


  • Vanessa Guillén, Fort Hood soldier who went missing in April, died 'in the line of duty,' Army says

    Vanessa Guillén, Fort Hood soldier who went missing in April, died 'in the line of duty,' Army saysGuillén's family will receive Army benefits, such as allowances, compensation for expenses, life insurance and a funeral with full military honors.


  • Donald Trump is getting desperate ? and his mental pathology is getting worse every day

    Donald Trump is getting desperate ? and his mental pathology is getting worse every dayAs mental health professionals, we see a disturbed and destructive man whose psyche is unraveling before our eyes


  • TikTok explicitly calls out white nationalism, white genocide theory, and male supremacy as hate speech

    TikTok explicitly calls out white nationalism, white genocide theory, and male supremacy as hate speechBig Tech platforms are rushing to update policies and try and stem a flood of hate speech.


  • Miami Springs nursing home with 52 COVID deaths fined $67,000, but not stripped of license

    Miami Springs nursing home with 52 COVID deaths fined $67,000, but not stripped of licenseFair Havens nursing home in Miami Springs, where 52 died of COVID-19, was issued a $67,000 fine by the state of Florida but also allowed to resume taking in new residents.


  • Former Mexican defense minister ordered held in U.S. jail without bond

    Former Mexican defense minister ordered held in U.S. jail without bondMexico's former defense minister, Salvador Cienfuegos, was ordered held in U.S. custody without bail on Tuesday, pending his trial on drug trafficking charges in a case that could have far-reaching implications for U.S. and Mexican anti-cartel strategy. A U.S. magistrate judge also ordered Cienfuegos, 72, sent to New York to stand trial. Cienfuegos was arrested at Los Angeles International Airport last week.


  • What you should know about gender pronouns, how to use them, and why they're important

    What you should know about gender pronouns, how to use them, and why they're importantToday is International Pronouns Day, a day to honor the importance and necessity of using trans and non-binary people's correct gender pronouns.


  • Taliban ambush kills at least 25 Afghan security personnel

    Taliban ambush kills at least 25 Afghan security personnelAt least 25 Afghan security force personnel were killed in an ambush blamed on the Taliban, officials said Wednesday, as spiralling violence imperils ongoing peace talks.


  • U.S. fighter jets intercept Russian bombers near Alaska

    U.S. fighter jets intercept Russian bombers near AlaskaU.S. fighter jets intercepted four Russian military aircraft in international airspace near Alaska, NORAD said.


  • Las Vegas resorts increase security amid shootings, fights on the Strip

    Las Vegas resorts increase security amid shootings, fights on the StripThe city is seeing an increase in violent events amid the COVID-19 pandemic.


  • ?Cheer? star Jerry Harris was warned before child porn arrest by the owner of a gym featured on ?AGT,? lawsuit claims

    ?Cheer? star Jerry Harris was warned before child porn arrest by the owner of a gym featured on ?AGT,? lawsuit claimsCheer Athletics co-owner Angela Rogers warned 'Cheer' star Jerry Harris about a possible investigation into his conduct, according to a lawsuit.


  • How Jaime Harrison thinks he can knock off Lindsey Graham

    How Jaime Harrison thinks he can knock off Lindsey GrahamThe Democratic vessel of anti-Trump outrage knows that taking on the president directly is a losing gambit in South Carolina.


  • A US lab used rockets to launch a semi-truck into a new tractor trailer built to transport nuclear weapons

    A US lab used rockets to launch a semi-truck into a new tractor trailer built to transport nuclear weapons"You've got to be able to ship nuclear assets safely and securely or you don't have a deterrence program," a lab project manager said.


  • Purple pumpkins are making a statement this Halloween. Here?s what they mean

    Purple pumpkins are making a statement this Halloween. Here?s what they mean?There seems to be some confusion about what a purple pumpkin really means?


  • 'We are the ones your children have nightmares about': A Maryland man has been charged with threatening to kidnap and kill Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    'We are the ones your children have nightmares about': A Maryland man has been charged with threatening to kidnap and kill Joe Biden and Kamala Harris"We are the ones with those scary guns," James Dale Reed wrote in a note left outside a house with Biden-Harris campaign signs in the front yard.


  • Afghans jostling for visas to Pakistan spark stampede, killing 15

    Afghans jostling for visas to Pakistan spark stampede, killing 15At least 15 people were killed in a stampede among thousands of Afghans gathered to apply for visas for neighbouring Pakistan in Afghanistan's eastern city of Jalalabad on Wednesday, officials said. Thousands of Afghans had congregated on the open ground, usually used for sports or public gatherings, waiting to collect tokens needed to apply for a visa, two provincial officials told Reuters. Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan said on Twitter he was "deeply saddened by the tragic deaths and casualties".


  • USPS still hasn't reversed election mail slowdown despite multiple court orders: attorneys general

    USPS still hasn't reversed election mail slowdown despite multiple court orders: attorneys generalNew inspector general report faults changes ordered by Trump donor turned Postmaster General Louis DeJoy for delays


  • Saudis shun 'made in Turkey' as rivalry deepens

    Saudis shun 'made in Turkey' as rivalry deepensFrom pickled vine leaves to coffee and cheese, Saudi supermarkets are taking Turkish products off the shelves after calls for a boycott, as rivalry between Riyadh and Ankara heats up.


  • Florida to investigate all COVID-19 deaths after questions about 'integrity' of data

    Florida to investigate all COVID-19 deaths after questions about 'integrity' of dataFORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. ? Florida, which has reported the deaths of more than 16,400 people from COVID-19, now says the public may not be able to trust any of those numbers. The state Department of Health on Wednesday ordered an investigation of all pandemic fatalities, one week after House Speaker Jose Oliva slammed the death data from medical examiners as "often lacking in rigor" and ...


  • U.S. spacecraft touches asteroid surface for rubble grab

    U.S. spacecraft touches asteroid surface for rubble grabA NASA spacecraft descended to an asteroid on Tuesday and momentarily touched the surface to collect cosmic rubble for return to Earth.


  • US election: Trump?s attacks on Dr Fauci are working - with fewer Americans trusting top scientist

    US election: Trump?s attacks on Dr Fauci are working - with fewer Americans trusting top scientistExclusive: US president's targeting of chief scientist over coronavirus is having effect, Independent poll finds


  • New Columbia Study Blames the White House for at Least 130,000 ?Avoidable? COVID Deaths

    New Columbia Study Blames the White House for at Least 130,000 ?Avoidable? COVID DeathsA new report from Columbia University on COVID-19 deaths estimates that hundreds of thousands of Americans died because the United States? response to the pandemic was an ?abject failure,? particularly the actions of President Donald Trump. With an adequate response, the United States could have avoided tens of thousands of deaths and an incalculable amount of suffering, the researchers said.Dr. Irwin Redlener, the lead author on the study and the founding director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness, laid the blame at the feet of the White House in an interview with The Daily Beast: ?We believe that this was a monumental, lethal screwup by an administration that didn?t want to deal with reality.?In the report, titled ?130,000?210,000 Avoidable COVID-19 Deaths?and Counting?in the U.S.?, researchers at Columbia?s NCDP studied ?the staggering and disproportionate nature of COVID-19 fatalities in the United States.?The researchers compared the coronavirus response of the U.S. to that of six other countries? South Korea, Japan, Australia, Germany, Canada, and France?and found that the American government?s response to the pandemic rated unfavorably against them all. The U.S. has suffered a COVID-19 fatality rate more than double that of Canada and 50 times that of Japan. Extrapolating from the deaths per 100,000 people in each country, the researchers estimated how the U.S. might have fared had it followed the example of a more robust response. The answer: always better than it did in reality.?If the U.S. had followed Canadian policies and protocols, there might have only been 85,192 U.S. deaths?making more than 132,500 American deaths ?avoidable.? If the U.S. response had mirrored that of Germany, the U.S. may have only had 38,457 deaths?leaving 179,260 avoidable deaths,? the researchers wrote.The researchers chose the half dozen countries that have achieved some level of success in responding to the pandemic.?We should model ourselves on the best. We should be the best,? Redlener said. ?We have the resources, the economy, the scientific expertise to do this the right way. We?re facing a lethal pandemic, and we had very misguided leadership that chose to berate the purveyors of masks and social distancing. The president himself became a superspreader. He has blood on his hands.?Researchers cite several well-known but catastrophic factors that plagued the U.S. response: insufficient testing, delayed lockdowns, a lack of a unified federal response, and a failure to mandate non-medical interventions like masks and social distancing. American leaders, the researchers wrote, have shown a ?failure to model best practices,? especially wearing masks during public appearances. Though research publications rarely venture into politics, both Scientific American and the New England Journal of Medicine have published editorials excoriating the Trump administration for its handling of the pandemic in the past month.?There continues to be confusion, mismanagement, and dishonesty, and we?re reaping the consequences of misconduct in office. Usually academic publications are not so overtly political, but this incredibly anti-science administration has caused an enormous tragedy in America. The fact that these deaths could have been avoided is a stunning realization,? Redlener said.More than 220,000 people in the United States have died of the coronavirus this year, and over 8.3 million have tested positive, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Public health experts estimate that millions more have contracted the virus but not received an official diagnosis because of a lack of adequate testing. The actual death toll from the virus also may be much higher than recorded.Public health officials across the country are warning that the upcoming winter may be an especially brutal period as coronavirus infections rise to a third peak and flu season arrives. Adding to that gloomy forecast, the Columbia researchers wrote that the federal government?s ?continued mismanagement? of the pandemic shows few indications of improvement: ?The abject failures of U.S. government policies and crisis messaging persist.?The end, according to Redlener, is nowhere in sight.?Americans have a bad case of pandemic fatigue. We want to get back to some semblance of normalcy, but we never did what we had to do to achieve that state,? he said. ?We?ve delayed the return of normalcy and fallen into this web of dishonesty and opposing science that was concocted by the president.?Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • These men tried to break into two homes within minutes. Here?s what it looked like

    These men tried to break into two homes within minutes. Here?s what it looked likeThe Broward Sheriff?s Office released video on Tuesday of two men they say tried to pull two burglaries from homes within minutes of one another.


  • Doctor asks court to dismiss murder indictment in 25 deaths

    Doctor asks court to dismiss murder indictment in 25 deathsLawyers for the Ohio hospital doctor charged with murder in 25 patient deaths accused the prosecutor of misconduct and asked Tuesday that the court dismiss the indictment handed up by a grand jury. Former intensive care doctor William Husel is accused of ordering excessive painkillers for patients who died shortly thereafter in the Columbus-area Mount Carmel Health System. Prosecutors charged him only in cases involving at least 500 micrograms of fentanyl, saying doses that big in nonsurgical situations pointed to an intent to prematurely snuff out lives.